<div>So the y in KS flehyk and the i in SWF flehik could be pronounced as schwa just as it can be in lebmyn and kegin then?<br></div><div><br></div><div>I'm trying to establish whether the diminutive suffix -ik was pronounced with a schwa in LC just like you have proved that non-diminutive words ending in -ik (like nadelik) and other endings like -in (kegin) were, or whether it was a special case that retained the proper i sound in LC.</div>
<div><br></div><div>Jed</div><div><br></div><br><div class="gmail_quote">On 18 July 2011 17:37, nicholas williams <span dir="ltr"><<a href="mailto:njawilliams@gmail.com">njawilliams@gmail.com</a>></span> wrote:<br><blockquote class="gmail_quote" style="margin:0 0 0 .8ex;border-left:1px #ccc solid;padding-left:1ex;">
<div style="word-wrap:break-word"><font face="Georgia"><font size="5"><span style="font-size:18px">I don't see your purpose of your question. <i>Nadelik</i> < <i>Natalicia</i>, <i>medhek</i> > <i>medicus</i>. The original -<i>ic</i>- in the Latin borrowings is phonetically identical with the the origin of the -<i>yk</i> suffix.</span></font></font><div>
<font face="Georgia"><font size="5"><span style="font-size:18px">I just wanted to point out that -<i>yk</i> can alternate with -<i>ak</i>. That means that the distinction between <i>ik</i>/<i>yk</i> and <i>ek</i>/<i>ak</i> is not phonemic</span></font></font><span style="font-family:Georgia;font-size:18px">.</span></div>
<div><font face="Georgia"><font size="5"><span style="font-size:18px"><br></span></font></font></div><font color="#888888"><div><font face="Georgia"><font size="5"><span style="font-size:18px">Nicholas</span></font></font></div>
</font><div class="im"><div><br></div><div><div><div><div>On 2011 Gor 18, at 17:19, Jed Matthews wrote:</div><br><blockquote type="cite"><span style="border-collapse:separate;font-family:Helvetica;font-style:normal;font-variant:normal;font-weight:normal;letter-spacing:normal;line-height:normal;text-indent:0px;text-transform:none;white-space:normal;word-spacing:0px;font-size:medium"><div>
Thanks for the examples, but do Nadelik, lowenek and medhek contain the diminutive suffix in their etymology?</div></span><br></blockquote></div><br></div></div></div></div><br>_______________________________________________<br>

Spellyans mailing list<br>
<a href="mailto:Spellyans@kernowek.net">Spellyans@kernowek.net</a><br>
<a href="http://kernowek.net/mailman/listinfo/spellyans_kernowek.net" target="_blank">http://kernowek.net/mailman/listinfo/spellyans_kernowek.net</a><br>
<br></blockquote></div><br>