<html><head></head><body style="word-wrap: break-word; -webkit-nbsp-mode: space; -webkit-line-break: after-white-space; "><div><div>On 2011 Gor 21, at 11:23, Nicholas Williams wrote:</div><blockquote type="cite"><font size="4">I have collected the following ways of saying 'Thank you' in traditional Cornish:<br><br><i>A das a nef <b>gromercy</b></i> OM 407<br></font></blockquote><blockquote type="cite">…</blockquote><blockquote type="cite"><font size="4"><i><b>mear a rase thewhy</b> sera</i>  CW 702<br><i><span class="Apple-style-span" style="font-style: normal;">…</span></i></font></blockquote><blockquote type="cite"><font size="4">
<i><b>Durdala dewhy</b>, syr</i> ‘Thank you, sir’ Borde<br><i>…<br></i>Nance seems to have ignored <i>Gromercy</i>, presumably because it seemed too much like a borrowing.<i> </i></font></blockquote><div><br></div><div>Your observation is incorrect. Nance (1938) contains the following entries:</div><div>p.44<span class="Apple-tab-span" style="white-space:pre">      </span>durdala dywhy</div><div>p.69<span class="Apple-tab-span" style="white-space:pre">    </span>grās…</div><div><span class="Apple-tab-span" style="white-space:pre">             </span>merastawhy, merastadu…</div><div><span class="Apple-tab-span" style="white-space:pre">             </span>mur ras dhywhy. <i>much thanks to you</i></div><div>p.70<span class="Apple-tab-span" style="white-space:pre">    </span>gromercy…thank you, great thanks, gramercy…</div><div><br></div><div>In a similar way, Nance (1955, p.174) has all of these, and more, under the headword <b>'thank'</b>, as does Nance (1952) under <b>'dur', 'grās' </b>and <b>'gromercy'</b>. I see no ignoral there by Nance.</div><div><br></div><blockquote type="cite"><font size="4">We have here yet another of Nance's purisms.<br></font></blockquote>Clearly not; the beam is in your own eye, Nicholas, not in Nance's.</div><div><br><blockquote type="cite"><font size="4">Should<i> not Gromercy</i> be the default way of saying 'I thank you' in the revived language?</font></blockquote>No, we should rejoice in the fact that Cornish has multiple ways of giving thanks, not forgetting:<br></div><div><b>aswon grās, gothvos grās, grassa.</b> We should further rejoice in the fact that, as H.W.Fowler (authorof <i>Oxford Dictionary</i> and <i>Modern English Usage</i>) observed, language is a democratic affair, and Kernewegoryon will make up their own minds about how to thank people, without needing any supposed 'default'.</div><div><br></div><div>Eddie Climo</div><div>
</div>
<br></body></html>