<html><head></head><body style="word-wrap: break-word; -webkit-nbsp-mode: space; -webkit-line-break: after-white-space; "><font class="Apple-style-span" face="Georgia"><font class="Apple-style-span" size="5"><span class="Apple-style-span" style="font-size: 18px;">Notice also that Pryce gives ARBEDNEK, presumably taken from Lhuyd's preface, like other items in his vocabulary,</span></font></font><div><font class="Apple-style-span" face="Georgia"><font class="Apple-style-span" size="5"><span class="Apple-style-span" style="font-size: 18px;">but Pryce says the word means 'usual, customary' (not 'special') ACB K 2 a.</span></font></font></div><div><br><div><div>On 2011 Gor 27, at 12:59, Craig Weatherhill wrote:</div><br class="Apple-interchange-newline"><blockquote type="cite"><span class="Apple-style-span" style="border-collapse: separate; font-family: Helvetica; font-style: normal; font-variant: normal; font-weight: normal; letter-spacing: normal; line-height: normal; orphans: 2; text-indent: 0px; text-transform: none; white-space: normal; widows: 2; word-spacing: 0px; -webkit-border-horizontal-spacing: 0px; -webkit-border-vertical-spacing: 0px; -webkit-text-decorations-in-effect: none; -webkit-text-size-adjust: auto; -webkit-text-stroke-width: 0px; font-size: medium; ">Do we know that Lhuyd invented it?  Or had he heard it used in speech?</span></blockquote></div><br></div></body></html>