<html><head></head><body style="word-wrap: break-word; -webkit-nbsp-mode: space; -webkit-line-break: after-white-space; ">I counted the examples electronically. It has been known for some time that gwruthyl was an invention of Nance's. I am astonished that the SWF glossators have not taken this on board.<div><br></div><div>Nicholas</div><div><br><div><div>On 2011 Gor 29, at 22:21, A. J. Trim wrote:</div><br class="Apple-interchange-newline"><blockquote type="cite"><span class="Apple-style-span" style="border-collapse: separate; font-family: Helvetica; font-style: normal; font-variant: normal; font-weight: normal; letter-spacing: normal; line-height: normal; orphans: 2; text-indent: 0px; text-transform: none; white-space: normal; widows: 2; word-spacing: 0px; -webkit-border-horizontal-spacing: 0px; -webkit-border-vertical-spacing: 0px; -webkit-text-decorations-in-effect: none; -webkit-text-size-adjust: auto; -webkit-text-stroke-width: 0px; font-size: medium; "><span class="Apple-style-span" style="font-family: Arial; font-size: 13px; "><div><font size="3">According to Nicholas, «*Gwruthyl» is unattested. However, Nance includes «gwrüthyl» in his 1952 EC dictionary, and in his 1955 CE dictionary.<span class="Apple-converted-space"> </span></font><font size="3">Wella Brown has it in his 1984 grammar. Ken George includes it in his 1993 CE dictionary.</font></div></span></span><br class="Apple-interchange-newline"></blockquote></div><br></div></body></html>