<html><head></head><body style="word-wrap: break-word; -webkit-nbsp-mode: space; -webkit-line-break: after-white-space; "><div><div>On 2011 Gor 29, at 17:22, nicholas williams wrote:</div><blockquote type="cite"><div style="word-wrap: break-word; -webkit-nbsp-mode: space; -webkit-line-break: after-white-space; "><font class="Apple-style-span" face="Georgia">I notice that under Course (direction) the glossary gives <i>hyns</i>. This word is unattested in Old, Middle and Late Cornish.</font></div></blockquote>Nance 1938 says that '<b>hins</b>' is found in the Old-Cornish Vocabulary; in his "Guide to Cornish Place-names", he gives the older form as ˘'hent'.<br><br><blockquote type="cite"><div style="word-wrap: break-word; -webkit-nbsp-mode: space; -webkit-line-break: after-white-space; "><font class="Apple-style-span" face="Georgia">It is found only as an element in <i>camhinsic</i>, <i>eunhinsic</i>, <i>kammynsoth</i>.</font></div></blockquote>So, those words would have been compounded like this in Old Cornish, presumably:</div><div><b><span class="Apple-tab-span" style="white-space:pre">      </span>camhinsic < cam + hins + -ic</b>. unjust, unrigheous, of evil ways. (UC. <b>camhensek</b>)</div><div><b><span class="Apple-tab-span" style="white-space:pre">     </span>eunhinsic < eun + hins + -ic</b>. upright, just (UC. <b>ewnhensek</b>)</div><div><b><span class="Apple-tab-span" style="white-space:pre"> </span>kammynsoth < kamm + hins + -eth</b>. immorality, unfairness, unrighteousness (UC. <b>camhenseth</b>.)</div><div>That looks like 3 more attestations to me. Furthermore, given the slimness of the Cornish lexicon, we can't afford to turn our noses up at a perfectly usable Cornish word, just because it's part of a compound. Moreover, '<b>hens</b>' has been in use throughout the whole of the Revival—certainly since 1934, when it appears in Nance's dictionary of that year. 85 years of usage have made it a commonly used word. That gives the word any needed legitimacy in the only court that counts with languages: that of usage. To reject 'hens' smacks of purism and pedantry!</div><div><br><blockquote type="cite"><div style="word-wrap: break-word; -webkit-nbsp-mode: space; -webkit-line-break: after-white-space; "><div><span class="Apple-style-span" style="font-family: Georgia; ">Under Carpenter the glossary gives <i>ser prenn </i>and a hypothetical RLC<i> ser predn</i>. <i>…</i>It is not attested in Middle Cornish.</span></div></div></blockquote><div>No matter, 'sairpren' is attested in Old Cornish. Revived Cornish cannot afford to pick and choose; Old, Middle or Late, if it's attested then that's good enough.</div><div><br></div><div><blockquote type="cite"><div style="word-wrap: break-word; -webkit-nbsp-mode: space; -webkit-line-break: after-white-space; "><div><span class="Apple-style-span" style="font-family: Georgia; "><i>Ser prenn</i> is a respelling of <i>sairpren</i> in OCV.</span></div></div></blockquote>Then it can hardly be 'hypothetical', surely.</div><div><br></div><br><blockquote type="cite"><div style="word-wrap: break-word; -webkit-nbsp-mode: space; -webkit-line-break: after-white-space; "><div><span class="Apple-style-span" style="font-family: Georgia; ">Under Chair the glossary gives <i>cador</i>, which is well attested in names of rocks. The ordinary word for 'chair' in the texts, however, is <i>chair</i>, <i>chayr</i>:</span></div></div></blockquote><div>'<b>Cader</b>' [? spelling] is, I gather, attested in the OCV. That makes it Cornish. Its presence in toponyms makes it further attested. I see no problem with using '<b>cader</b>' in RC.</div><br><blockquote type="cite"><div style="word-wrap: break-word; -webkit-nbsp-mode: space; -webkit-line-break: after-white-space; "><div style="margin-top: 0px; margin-right: 0px; margin-bottom: 0px; margin-left: 0px; font: normal normal normal 12px/normal Baskerville; "><span style="letter-spacing: 0.0px"><font class="Apple-style-span" face="Georgia"><div style="margin-top: 0px; margin-right: 0px; margin-bottom: 0px; margin-left: 0px; font: normal normal normal 12px/normal Baskerville; "><span style="letter-spacing: 0.0px"><font class="Apple-style-span" face="Georgia"><div style="margin-top: 0px; margin-right: 0px; margin-bottom: 0px; margin-left: 0px; font: normal normal normal 12px/normal Baskerville; "><div style="margin-top: 0px; margin-right: 0px; margin-bottom: 0px; margin-left: 0px; font: normal normal normal 12px/normal Baskerville; "><div style="margin-top: 0px; margin-right: 0px; margin-bottom: 0px; margin-left: 0px; font: normal normal normal 12px/normal Baskerville; "><span class="Apple-style-span" style="font-family: Georgia; "><font class="Apple-style-span" size="4"><span class="Apple-style-span" style="font-size: 14px;">Under Creator the glossary gives </span></font><i><font class="Apple-style-span" size="4"><span class="Apple-style-span" style="font-size: 14px;">gwrier</span></font></i><font class="Apple-style-span" size="4"><span class="Apple-style-span" style="font-size: 14px;">, </span></font><i><font class="Apple-style-span" size="4"><span class="Apple-style-span" style="font-size: 14px;">creador</span></font></i><font class="Apple-style-span" size="4"><span class="Apple-style-span" style="font-size: 14px;"> and </span></font><i><font class="Apple-style-span" size="4"><span class="Apple-style-span" style="font-size: 14px;">furvyer</span></font></i><font class="Apple-style-span" size="4"><span class="Apple-style-span" style="font-size: 14px;">. </span></font><i><font class="Apple-style-span" size="4"><span class="Apple-style-span" style="font-size: 14px;">Gwrier</span></font></i><font class="Apple-style-span" size="4"><span class="Apple-style-span" style="font-size: 14px;"> is attested in Middle Cornish. </span></font><i><font class="Apple-style-span" size="4"><span class="Apple-style-span" style="font-size: 14px;">Creador</span></font></i><font class="Apple-style-span" size="4"><span class="Apple-style-span" style="font-size: 14px;"> is in OCV. </span></font></span></div></div></div></font></span></div></font></span></div></div></blockquote><div>So no problem with using either of those in RC.</div><br><blockquote type="cite"><div style="word-wrap: break-word; -webkit-nbsp-mode: space; -webkit-line-break: after-white-space; "><div style="margin-top: 0px; margin-right: 0px; margin-bottom: 0px; margin-left: 0px; font: normal normal normal 12px/normal Baskerville; "><span style="letter-spacing: 0.0px"><font class="Apple-style-span" face="Georgia"><div style="margin-top: 0px; margin-right: 0px; margin-bottom: 0px; margin-left: 0px; font: normal normal normal 12px/normal Baskerville; "><span style="letter-spacing: 0.0px"><font class="Apple-style-span" face="Georgia"><div style="margin-top: 0px; margin-right: 0px; margin-bottom: 0px; margin-left: 0px; font: normal normal normal 12px/normal Baskerville; "><div style="margin-top: 0px; margin-right: 0px; margin-bottom: 0px; margin-left: 0px; font: normal normal normal 12px/normal Baskerville; "><div style="margin-top: 0px; margin-right: 0px; margin-bottom: 0px; margin-left: 0px; font: normal normal normal 12px/normal Baskerville; "><span class="Apple-style-span" style="font-family: Georgia; "><i><font class="Apple-style-span" size="4"><span class="Apple-style-span" style="font-size: 14px;">Furvyer</span></font></i><font class="Apple-style-span" size="4"><span class="Apple-style-span" style="font-size: 14px;"> is an invention. The word </span></font><i><font class="Apple-style-span" size="4"><span class="Apple-style-span" style="font-size: 14px;">formyer</span></font></i><font class="Apple-style-span" size="4"><span class="Apple-style-span" style="font-size: 14px;"> is attested in Middle Cornish. Indeed it occurs it occurs in three different texts.</span></font></span></div></div></div></font></span></div></font></span></div></div></blockquote><div>We find in Cornish the following set of words derived regularly from the stem:</div><div><span class="Apple-tab-span" style="white-space:pre"><b>    </b></span><b>form > formya > formyer.</b></div><div>We also find  'furf' [?spelling] in the OCV at least. so it's perfectly reasonable to extrapolate on the same paradigm:</div><div><span class="Apple-tab-span" style="white-space:pre"><b>    </b></span><b>furf > *furvya > *furvyer.</b></div><div><br></div><blockquote type="cite"><div style="word-wrap: break-word; -webkit-nbsp-mode: space; -webkit-line-break: after-white-space; "><div style="margin-top: 0px; margin-right: 0px; margin-bottom: 0px; margin-left: 0px; font: normal normal normal 12px/normal Baskerville; "><span style="letter-spacing: 0.0px"><font class="Apple-style-span" face="Georgia"><div style="margin-top: 0px; margin-right: 0px; margin-bottom: 0px; margin-left: 0px; font: normal normal normal 12px/normal Baskerville; "><span style="letter-spacing: 0.0px"><font class="Apple-style-span" face="Georgia"><div style="margin-top: 0px; margin-right: 0px; margin-bottom: 0px; margin-left: 0px; font: normal normal normal 12px/normal Baskerville; "><div style="margin-top: 0px; margin-right: 0px; margin-bottom: 0px; margin-left: 0px; font: normal normal normal 12px/normal Baskerville; "><div style="margin-top: 0px; margin-right: 0px; margin-bottom: 0px; margin-left: 0px; font: normal normal normal 12px/normal Baskerville; "><font class="Apple-style-span" face="Georgia"><div style="margin-top: 0px; margin-right: 0px; margin-bottom: 0px; margin-left: 0px; font: normal normal normal 12px/normal Baskerville; "><span class="Apple-style-span" style="font-family: Georgia; "><div style="margin-top: 0px; margin-right: 0px; margin-bottom: 0px; margin-left: 0px; font: normal normal normal 12px/normal Baskerville; "><div style="margin-top: 0px; margin-right: 0px; margin-bottom: 0px; margin-left: 0px; font: normal normal normal 12px/normal Baskerville; "><div style="margin-top: 0px; margin-right: 0px; margin-bottom: 0px; margin-left: 0px; font: normal normal normal 12px/normal Baskerville; "><span class="Apple-style-span" style="font-family: Georgia; "><font class="Apple-style-span" size="4"><span class="Apple-style-span" style="font-size: 14px;">Have the compilers really read the texts?</span></font></span></div></div></div></span></div></font></div></div></div></font></span></div></font></span></div></div></blockquote>pot + kettle = black?</div><div><br></div><div>Eddie Climo</div><div><br></div></body></html>