<html><head></head><body style="word-wrap: break-word; -webkit-nbsp-mode: space; -webkit-line-break: after-white-space; "><font class="Apple-style-span" face="Georgia"><font class="Apple-style-span" size="5"><span class="Apple-style-span" style="font-size: 18px;">Deiniol is completely right. Welsh <i>gwaith</i> 'work', Cornish <i>gweyth</i>, gwyth derives from the root *<i>wegh</i>- and are unrelated to the root seen in Cornish <i>gruthyl</i>, Welsh <i>gwneuthur</i>. My mystake.</span></font></font><div><font class="Apple-style-span" face="Georgia"><font class="Apple-style-span" size="5"><span class="Apple-style-span" style="font-size: 18px;">OIr <i>fecht</i> 'time', Cornish <i>gweyth</i> belongs to this root, rather than to that behind OIr <i>fich</i>- 'to fight'.</span></font></font></div><div><font class="Apple-style-span" face="Georgia"><font class="Apple-style-span" size="5"><span class="Apple-style-span" style="font-size: 18px;">Welsh <i>gwneuthur</i>, <i>gwneud</i> and Cornish <i>gruthyl</i>, <i>gul</i> do belong to the root *<i>wreg</i>-.</span></font></font></div><div><font class="Apple-style-span" face="Georgia"><font class="Apple-style-span" size="5"><span class="Apple-style-span" style="font-size: 18px;">Irish <i>do-gní</i> 'does', <i>dénam</i> 'to do', on the other hand are apparently related to the root seen in Welsh <i>gweini</i> 'to serve' and Cornish <i>gonys</i> 'to cultivate'.</span></font></font></div><div><font class="Apple-style-span" face="Georgia"><font class="Apple-style-span" size="5"><span class="Apple-style-span" style="font-size: 18px;"><br></span></font></font></div><div><font class="Apple-style-span" face="Georgia"><font class="Apple-style-span" size="5"><span class="Apple-style-span" style="font-size: 18px;">Nicholas</span></font></font></div><div><br><div><div>On 2011 Gor 31, at 00:54, Deiniol Jones wrote:</div><br class="Apple-interchange-newline"><blockquote type="cite"><span class="Apple-style-span" style="border-collapse: separate; font-family: Helvetica; font-style: normal; font-variant: normal; font-weight: normal; letter-spacing: normal; line-height: normal; orphans: 2; text-indent: 0px; text-transform: none; white-space: normal; widows: 2; word-spacing: 0px; -webkit-border-horizontal-spacing: 0px; -webkit-border-vertical-spacing: 0px; -webkit-text-decorations-in-effect: none; -webkit-text-size-adjust: auto; -webkit-text-stroke-width: 0px; font-size: medium; ">I was under the impression that the communis opinio has it that C. gweyth (along with its cognates W. gwaith and B. gwezh) derives from a Proto-Celtic *wexta:, ultimately from the PIE *weg'h-, as seen in Latin ueho, etc, and that the original sense was "course, period of time", with a later semantic extension to "work". Am I behind the times here? (I'm also aware of an alternate etymon in PIE *weik- "be victorious", which brings in OI fecht, but IIRC this isn't well supported by the Academy.)<br><br>Deiniol</span></blockquote></div><br></div></body></html>