<html><head></head><body style="word-wrap: break-word; -webkit-nbsp-mode: space; -webkit-line-break: after-white-space; "><div>Sad news, indeed. As for your epigram, how about:</div><div><br></div><div>Tremena cothwas a lesk lyverva.</div><div><br></div><div>Eddie Climo</div><br><div><div>On 2011 Est 2, at 21:54, A. J. Trim wrote:</div><br class="Apple-interchange-newline"><blockquote type="cite"><div style="WORD-WRAP: break-word; -webkit-nbsp-mode: space; -webkit-line-break: after-white-space" dir="ltr">
<div dir="ltr">
<div style="FONT-FAMILY: 'Arial'; COLOR: #000000; FONT-SIZE: 10pt">
<div><font size="3">Sad news of course. I hope that he has inspired others to 
follow him.</font></div>
<div><font size="3"></font> </div>
<div><font size="3">The line that stands out, in this article, is “When an old man 
dies, a library burns.”</font></div>
<div><font size="3">This is very true, and it should be remembered.</font></div>
<div><font size="3"></font> </div>
<div><font size="3">How should that be translated into Cornish?</font></div>
<div><font size="3">I could suggest:</font></div>
<div><font size="3"></font> </div>
<div><font size="3">«Hag a ȝeces den coth, lyverva a wra tanys»</font></div>
<div><font size="3"></font> </div>
<div><font size="3">but I’m sure that someone will come up with a better 
version.</font></div></div></div></div></blockquote></div></body></html>