<html><head></head><body style="word-wrap: break-word; -webkit-nbsp-mode: space; -webkit-line-break: after-white-space; "><font class="Apple-style-span" face="Georgia"><font class="Apple-style-span" size="5"><span class="Apple-style-span" style="font-size: 18px;">Under <i>Krampez</i> 'A Pie' Borlase gives<i> gil krampez l'avalou</i> 'to make an apple pie'.</span></font></font><div><font class="Apple-style-span" face="Georgia"><font class="Apple-style-span" size="5"><span class="Apple-style-span" style="font-size: 18px;">This unlikely to have come from Lhuyd who gives <i>Krampothan</i>, plural <i>Krampedh</i> 'A fritter,</span></font></font></div><div><font class="Apple-style-span" face="Georgia"><font class="Apple-style-span" size="5"><span class="Apple-style-span" style="font-size: 18px;">a pan-cake' AB: 75bc.</span></font></font></div><div><font class="Apple-style-span" face="Georgia"><font class="Apple-style-span" size="5"><span class="Apple-style-span" style="font-size: 18px;"><i>Krampez</i> with a final z is closer to <i>CRAMPESSAN </i>'a pancake' in Pryce (ACB: M 1v).</span></font></font></div><div><font class="Apple-style-span" face="Georgia"><font class="Apple-style-span" size="5"><span class="Apple-style-span" style="font-size: 18px;">It is likely, I think, that Borlase got the phrase from a traditional source.</span></font></font></div><div><font class="Apple-style-span" face="Georgia"><font class="Apple-style-span" size="5"><span class="Apple-style-span" style="font-size: 18px;"><i>Gwil crampes lavalow</i> (<i>avalow</i>) then is the traditional way of saying 'to make an apple pie'.</span></font></font></div><div><font class="Apple-style-span" face="Georgia"><font class="Apple-style-span" size="5"><span class="Apple-style-span" style="font-size: 18px;"><br></span></font></font></div><div><font class="Apple-style-span" face="Georgia"><font class="Apple-style-span" size="5"><span class="Apple-style-span" style="font-size: 18px;">Nicholas</span></font></font></div></body></html>