<html><head></head><body style="word-wrap: break-word; -webkit-nbsp-mode: space; -webkit-line-break: after-white-space; "><font class="Apple-style-span" face="Georgia"><font class="Apple-style-span" size="5"><span class="Apple-style-span" style="font-size: 18px;">I don't think it's hiatus, Dan. The proto-form is something like *<i>dhei-ati-s</i> < <i>dhei</i> 'suck'.  The <i>ei</i> would give <i>wy</i>/<i>yw</i> and this is the source of w. In Welsh <i>diod</i>, Breton <i>died</i> the -w- is lost, in Cornish apparently not.</span></font></font><div><font class="Apple-style-span" face="Georgia"><font class="Apple-style-span" size="5"><span class="Apple-style-span" style="font-size: 18px;"><br></span></font></font><div><div>On 2011 Est 4, at 11:46, Daniel Prohaska wrote:</div><br class="Apple-interchange-newline"><blockquote type="cite"><span class="Apple-style-span" style="border-collapse: separate; font-family: Helvetica; font-style: normal; font-variant: normal; font-weight: normal; letter-spacing: normal; line-height: normal; orphans: 2; text-indent: 0px; text-transform: none; white-space: normal; widows: 2; word-spacing: 0px; -webkit-border-horizontal-spacing: 0px; -webkit-border-vertical-spacing: 0px; -webkit-text-decorations-in-effect: none; -webkit-text-size-adjust: auto; -webkit-text-stroke-width: 0px; font-size: medium; "><span class="Apple-style-span" style="color: rgb(0, 0, 128); font-family: Gentium; font-size: 16px; ">My take is that this particular word developed irregularly and inserted /<span class="SpellE">w</span>/ in the hiatus and then followed the same development as SWF<span class="Apple-converted-space"> </span><span class="SpellE"><b><i><span style="font-weight: bold; font-style: italic; ">diwedh</span></i></b></span>. Does anybody have a better explanation?</span></span></blockquote></div><br></div></body></html>