<html><head></head><body style="word-wrap: break-word; -webkit-nbsp-mode: space; -webkit-line-break: after-white-space; "><div style="margin-top: 0px; margin-right: 0px; margin-bottom: 0px; margin-left: 0px; text-align: justify; font: normal normal normal 12px/normal 'Times New Roman'; "><span style="letter-spacing: 0.0px"><font class="Apple-style-span" face="Georgia"><font class="Apple-style-span" size="5"><span class="Apple-style-span" style="font-size: 18px;">Nance taught that the Middle Cornish for ‘small’ was *<b>byghan</b>. He was, I fear, mistaken. The form *<b>byghan</b> is nowhere attested in traditional Cornish, though PA has <b>beghan</b> twice (PA 53c, PA 166b). <b>Byhan</b> occurs four times in the Ordinalia, while <b>behen</b> and <b>behan</b> once each in BK. By far the commonest spellings for this word are <b>byan</b> x 14, <b>byen</b> x 13 (Ordinalia and BM) or <b>bean</b> x 12 (TH and NBoson). Lhuyd writes <b>bîan</b> <i>passim</i>. </span></font></font></span></div><div style="margin-top: 0px; margin-right: 0px; margin-bottom: 0px; margin-left: 0px; text-align: justify; font: normal normal normal 12px/normal 'Times New Roman'; "><span style="letter-spacing: 0.0px"><span class="Apple-tab-span" style="white-space:pre"><font class="Apple-style-span" face="Georgia"><font class="Apple-style-span" size="5"><span class="Apple-style-span" style="font-size: 18px;">       </span></font></font></span><font class="Apple-style-span" face="Georgia"><font class="Apple-style-span" size="5"><span class="Apple-style-span" style="font-size: 18px;">It is quite apparent that the medial fricative had either weakened to [h] in Middle Cornish or had been lost entirely. Nance with his inexplicable desire to render Cornish as archaic as possible, created the unattested form *<b>byghan</b>, presumably by analogy with Welsh <b>bychan</b>. Breton <b>bihan</b> can hardly have influenced his thinking, since if it had, he would have written <b>byhan</b>, a form which has the merit of being attested. <b>Byan</b>, incidentally, was the form favoured by Talek in <i>An Lef Kernewek</i>. As a result of Nance’s archaising, generations of Cornish learners have tried and are continuing to try to pronounce the word for ‘small’ as ['bix@n]. Yet no such form seems to have existed in the earliest Middle Cornish, to say nothing of the later language. The word should be written <b>byan</b> or <b>bian</b> and be pronounced as it is written. </span></font></font></span></div><div style="margin-top: 0px; margin-right: 0px; margin-bottom: 0px; margin-left: 0px; text-align: justify; font: normal normal normal 12px/normal 'Times New Roman'; "><span style="letter-spacing: 0.0px"><span class="Apple-tab-span" style="white-space:pre"><font class="Apple-style-span" face="Georgia"><font class="Apple-style-span" size="5"><span class="Apple-style-span" style="font-size: 18px;">  </span></font></font></span></span></div><div style="margin-top: 0px; margin-right: 0px; margin-bottom: 0px; margin-left: 0px; text-align: justify; font: normal normal normal 12px/normal 'Times New Roman'; "><span class="Apple-style-span" style="font-family: Georgia; font-size: 18px; ">Nicholas</span></div><div><span style="letter-spacing: 0.0px"><br></span></div></body></html>