<html><head></head><body style="word-wrap: break-word; -webkit-nbsp-mode: space; -webkit-line-break: after-white-space; "><font class="Apple-style-span" face="Georgia" size="5">For 'ankle' revived Cornish uses <i>ufern</i>, respelt from the mispelt <i>lifern</i> 'talus' of OCV.</font><div><font class="Apple-style-span" face="Georgia" size="5">Lhuyd, however, </font><span class="Apple-style-span" style="font-family: Georgia; font-size: x-large; "> </span><span class="Apple-style-span" style="font-family: Georgia; font-size: x-large; ">s.v. <i>Malleolus</i> 'a small hammer;  ankle or ankle-bone' </span><span class="Apple-style-span" style="font-family: Georgia; font-size: x-large; ">gives <i>morthol bian</i> and <i>gybbedern</i> AB: 84b.</span></div><div><font class="Apple-style-span" face="Georgia" size="5"><i>Gybbedern</i> is the same word as <i>goobiddar</i> 'ankels' [sic] in the Bodewryd glossary. </font></div><div><font class="Apple-style-span" face="Georgia" size="5">The word was probably <i><b>gobederen</b></i> f. (<i>gybbedern</i>) with a collective plural  <i><b>gobeder</b></i> (<i>goobiddar</i>).</font></div><div><font class="Apple-style-span" face="Georgia" size="5">This I take to derive from <i>go</i>- 'under, small' and *<i>pederen</i> 'a bead' (< <i>Pater</i> (<i>noster</i>)).</font></div><div><font class="Apple-style-span" face="Georgia" size="5"><i>Gobederen</i> then means 'a small bead' and is a reference to the use in former times of</font></div><div><font class="Apple-style-span" face="Georgia" size="5">sheep's ankle bones in the game of dibs, jacks or five-stones. From this comes the use of <i>gobederen</i></font></div><div><font class="Apple-style-span" face="Georgia" size="5">to mean any ankle bone</font></div><div><font class="Apple-style-span" face="Georgia" size="5">Does this seem credible?</font></div><div><font class="Apple-style-span" face="Georgia" size="5"><br></font></div><div><font class="Apple-style-span" face="Georgia" size="5">Nicholas</font></div></body></html>