<html><head></head><body style="word-wrap: break-word; -webkit-nbsp-mode: space; -webkit-line-break: after-white-space; "><font class="Apple-style-span" face="Georgia" size="5">I pointed out recently that <i>byghan</i>, the UC and KK way of spelling the word for 'small' was not attested in the texts.</font><div><font class="Apple-style-span" face="Georgia" size="5">Craig rightly observed that <byghan> was  not unknown in place-names.</font></div><div><font class="Apple-style-span" face="Georgia" size="5">It should be observed that the SWF does not write <byghan> but <byhan> and <bian>.</font></div><div><font class="Apple-style-span" face="Georgia" size="5"><br></font></div><div><font class="Apple-style-span" face="Georgia" size="5">The objection to <byghan> is not without force. If one listens regularly to Radyo an Gernewegva,</font></div><div><font class="Apple-style-span" face="Georgia" size="5">one hears people (I name no names) who have learnt UC or KK trying to say ['bix@n] and instead</font></div><div><font class="Apple-style-span" face="Georgia" size="5">saying ['bik@n]. </font></div><div><font class="Apple-style-span" face="Georgia" size="5"><br></font></div><div><font class="Apple-style-span" face="Georgia" size="5">The fault is certainly in the spelling. Nance himself, however, in <i>Cornish for All </i>(1949, page 2) says:</font></div><div><font class="Apple-style-span" face="Georgia" size="5"><br></font></div><div><font class="Apple-style-span" face="Georgia" size="5">"<b>gh</b> is a faintly guttural <i>h</i>, tending to become quite silent, e.g.<i> mogh ha porghelly </i>would be almost</font></div><div><font class="Apple-style-span" face="Georgia" size="5"><i>moha purelly</i>. Maraz(ion) preserves the sound of <b>Marghas</b>; what is historically the same sound—the strong</font></div><div><font class="Apple-style-span" face="Georgia" size="5"><b>ch</b> of Welsh, the weaker <b>c'h</b> of Breton—in some positions is made <b>h</b> in Cornish, e.g. <b>hollan</b>, while Welsh</font></div><div><font class="Apple-style-span" face="Georgia" size="5"><b>chw</b>, Breton <b>c'hou</b>, is made <b>wh</b>, e.g. <b>whel</b>, <b>whylas</b> and tends to sound as <b>w</b>, e.g. <b>dheugh-why</b> was also spelt</font></div><div><font class="Apple-style-span" face="Georgia" size="5"><b>dhywy</b>."</font></div><div><font class="Apple-style-span" face="Georgia" size="5"><br></font></div><div><font class="Apple-style-span" face="Georgia" size="5">Similarly Caradar spells the word <i>byghan</i> with a macron over the y (<i>Cornish Simplified</i> 1955, page 18) but tells his learners</font></div><div><font class="Apple-style-span" face="Georgia" size="5">to pronounce it <i>bee'-an. </i></font></div><div><font class="Apple-style-span" face="Georgia" size="5"><i><br></i></font></div><div><font class="Apple-style-span" face="Georgia" size="5">If the -<i>gh</i>- is indeed silent, then <byan> or at least <byhan> would have been better spellings in UC.</font></div><div><font class="Apple-style-span" face="Georgia" size="5"><br></font></div><div><font class="Apple-style-span" face="Georgia" size="5">Nicholas</font></div></body></html>