<html><head></head><body style="word-wrap: break-word; -webkit-nbsp-mode: space; -webkit-line-break: after-white-space; ">Not all final fs are to be pronounced v. There is no evidence that genef was genev (pace Jenner). The evidence points<div>to a weakly articulated f or zero. Gene 'with me' is attested 20 times and gyne x 19.</div><div>It really is not fair to call a phonetic orthography 'dumbed-down'. That is a disparaging term and is unhelpful.</div><div>Many European languages write completely phonetically. Are German and Welsh and Hungarian and Spanish dumbed-down?</div><div>The absence of diacritics is quite a different matter, and in France they are seldom used with upper case letters.</div><div><br></div><div>Porth seems to me to be quite a good spelling for Par. We can see that the vowel was lowered slightly before r </div><div>and that the final segment rth was reduced to rh.</div><div>There is nothing to prevent people from writing Porth and pronouncing the name Parh or whatever.</div><div>It just requires a little knowledge. The opposite of dumbing down.</div><div><br></div><div>Nicholas</div><div><br><div><div>On 2011 Gwn 8, at 11:04, Ray Chubb wrote:</div><br class="Apple-interchange-newline"><blockquote type="cite"><span class="Apple-style-span" style="border-collapse: separate; font-family: Helvetica; font-style: normal; font-variant: normal; font-weight: normal; letter-spacing: normal; line-height: normal; orphans: 2; text-align: -webkit-auto; text-indent: 0px; text-transform: none; white-space: normal; widows: 2; word-spacing: 0px; -webkit-border-horizontal-spacing: 0px; -webkit-border-vertical-spacing: 0px; -webkit-text-decorations-in-effect: none; -webkit-text-size-adjust: auto; -webkit-text-stroke-width: 0px; font-size: medium; ">As I said, is it really so difficult to remember to give final 'f' a 'v' sound?</span><br class="Apple-interchange-newline"></blockquote></div><br></div></body></html>