<html><head></head><body style="word-wrap: break-word; -webkit-nbsp-mode: space; -webkit-line-break: after-white-space; ">Manx and Cornish have pre-occlusion for the same reason, I think. Both are Celtic languages in the mouths of Germanic speakers.<div>The Gaelic of Man was spoken by imperfectly gaelicised Norsemen. Middle Cornish was the language of people many of whom had until fairly</div><div>recently been speaking West Saxon, but who became reCelticised after the Norman conquest.</div><div>The natural way for English speakers to pronounce a long n is to make it dn. Similarly with long l.</div><div>The Irish of Munster has no distinction between l and L so the name Domhnall is Dónal and this appears in English as Donal.</div><div>In the Gaelic of Scotland the same name has a long L and appears in English as Donald.</div><div><br></div><div>Nicholas</div><div><br><div><div>On 2011 Gwn 7, at 22:31, Craig Weatherhill wrote:</div><br class="Apple-interchange-newline"><blockquote type="cite"><span class="Apple-style-span" style="border-collapse: separate; font-family: Helvetica; font-style: normal; font-variant: normal; font-weight: normal; letter-spacing: normal; line-height: normal; orphans: 2; text-align: -webkit-auto; text-indent: 0px; text-transform: none; white-space: normal; widows: 2; word-spacing: 0px; -webkit-border-horizontal-spacing: 0px; -webkit-border-vertical-spacing: 0px; -webkit-text-decorations-in-effect: none; -webkit-text-size-adjust: auto; -webkit-text-stroke-width: 0px; font-size: medium; ">That is strange regarding the pre-occlusion in Manx.  </span></blockquote></div><br></div></body></html>