<html><head></head><body style="word-wrap: break-word; -webkit-nbsp-mode: space; -webkit-line-break: after-white-space; ">Not so. The reason for using final v after stressed vowels were that it represented the pronunciation better than f. Moreover RLC used final v in nev, hav, gwav, ov etc. and<div>RLC users were very happy to see v appear in KS.</div><div><br></div><div>As for spellings like eff and neff, it is not impossible that the graph <ff> was used to show that the final labio-dental was to be pronounced rather than omitted.<br><div><br><div><div>On 2011 Gwn 8, at 20:18, A. J. Trim wrote:</div><br class="Apple-interchange-newline"><blockquote type="cite"><span class="Apple-style-span" style="border-collapse: separate; font-family: Helvetica; font-style: normal; font-variant: normal; font-weight: normal; letter-spacing: normal; line-height: normal; orphans: 2; text-align: -webkit-auto; text-indent: 0px; text-transform: none; white-space: normal; widows: 2; word-spacing: 0px; -webkit-border-horizontal-spacing: 0px; -webkit-border-vertical-spacing: 0px; -webkit-text-decorations-in-effect: none; -webkit-text-size-adjust: auto; -webkit-text-stroke-width: 0px; font-size: medium; ">I suspect that KS2 uses -v when stressed mainly because the SWF does</span></blockquote></div><br></div></div></body></html>