<html><head></head><body style="word-wrap: break-word; -webkit-nbsp-mode: space; -webkit-line-break: after-white-space; ">And is very unlikely. Cornish is so unlike Breton in other ways that it is difficult that it would resemble Breton here (particularly since Modern Breton has neither dh nor th).<div>The shift of tad > tas and bochodoc > bohosak are enough to show that Cornish was very different phonetically from both Welsh and Breton.</div><div>Cornish pre-occlusion, wholly absent from Breton,  is another pointer to huge differences.</div><div>The simplest way of understanding dh ~ th is to say that it resembles g ~ k, i.e. g after stressed vowels and k after unstressed ones.</div><div>This would be because the stressed vowel with its greater "vowelness" smeared voicing onto the lenis.</div><div>The unstressed vowel being less intense did not.</div><div>The SWF accepts this alternation in that it writes bydh but nowyth. Although nowyth is the only word where this phenomenon is allowed in the SWF.</div><div><br></div><div>Nicholas</div><div><br><div><div>On 2011 Gwn 8, at 07:10, Daniel Prohaska wrote:</div><br class="Apple-interchange-newline"><blockquote type="cite"><span class="Apple-style-span" style="border-collapse: separate; font-family: Helvetica; font-style: normal; font-variant: normal; font-weight: normal; letter-spacing: normal; line-height: normal; orphans: 2; text-align: -webkit-auto; text-indent: 0px; text-transform: none; white-space: normal; widows: 2; word-spacing: 0px; -webkit-border-horizontal-spacing: 0px; -webkit-border-vertical-spacing: 0px; -webkit-text-decorations-in-effect: none; -webkit-text-size-adjust: auto; -webkit-text-stroke-width: 0px; font-size: medium; "><span class="Apple-style-span" style="color: rgb(0, 0, 128); font-family: Gentium; font-size: 16px; ">Perhaps Cornish originally had a similar system to Modern Breton, where voiced consonants<span class="Apple-converted-space"> </span><span class="SpellE">unvoice</span><span class="Apple-converted-space"> </span>in absolute final position and in unvoiced environments, while they remain voiced before a following word beginning with a vowel and in voiced environments. This amount of phonological detail is difficult to retrieve so it will always remain a theory.</span></span></blockquote></div><br></div></body></html>