<html><body style="word-wrap: break-word; -webkit-nbsp-mode: space; -webkit-line-break: after-white-space; ">Here's an interesting attestation of '<b>tryga</b>' being used in an inflected personal form. It's from the chorus of the traditional song 'Wembalo', as recorded by Mr.C.C.James (Old Cornwall, III 521).<br><div><br></div><div><blockquote type="cite"><b>'Wembalo' <i>(burdhen):</i></b></blockquote><blockquote type="cite">Gans ow whym wham wembalo,<br>Coweth hunek yn benbalo,<br>Meppygow yn benbalo, <br>yn blejen (a) drygons-y.</blockquote><br></div><div>Note that this personal form is not demanded by the song's metre: '<b>yn blejen trygys yns (y)</b>' has the same scansion. And there's no rhyme to consider with this line. It would seem to be a simple stylistic choice.</div><div><br></div><div>Of course, there's nothing wrong with '<b>trygys yu/yma trygys' </b>etc., but it seems there's another attested possibility we may use.</div><div><br></div><div>Eddie Climo</div></body></html>