<style type="text/css">p { margin-bottom: 0.21cm; }</style>


<p style="margin-bottom: 0cm;">One can see just by looking at it that
<u>yn blejen a drygons y </u><span style="text-decoration: none;">is
not traditional Cornish, but a
revivalist translation. First: y drygons y does not mean 'they live,
they dwell' but 'they will reamain'. Second: blejen is unattested
anywhere in Middle or Late Cornish. It is cited by Lhuyd and the
preform is in OCV. Blejen as the default word for 'flower' is another
of Nance's legacies. The word for flower in Cornish is flour or
flouren. Third: yn blejen is neither the subject nor the predicate of
the verb; the correct form of the verb would be y trygons y.</span></p>

<p style="margin-bottom: 0cm;"><span style="text-decoration: none;">Nicholas</span></p>
<br><br><div class="gmail_quote">On Mon, Sep 19, 2011 at 10:07 AM, Jon Mills <span dir="ltr"><<a href="mailto:j.mills@email.com">j.mills@email.com</a>></span> wrote:<br><blockquote class="gmail_quote" style="margin: 0pt 0pt 0pt 0.8ex; border-left: 1px solid rgb(204, 204, 204); padding-left: 1ex;">
<span style="font-family: Verdana;"><span style="font-size: 12px;">Eddie, the chorus that you quote here is Merv Davey's Cornish translation of the original. See Merv Davey (1983) <i>Hungan</i> Redruth: Dyllansow Truran. The original found in <i>Old Cornwall </i>is in English.<br>
 
Ol an gwella,<br> 
Jon<br> 
<p style="margin: 0px; padding: 0px;"> 
         </p> 
<blockquote style="border-left: 1px solid rgb(204, 204, 204); margin: 0px 0px 0px 5px; padding-left: 5px;" type="cite"> 
        <p style="margin: 0px; padding: 0px;"> 
                <span style="font-family: Verdana;"><span style="font-size: 12px;">----- Original Message -----</span></span></p> 
        <p style="margin: 0px; padding: 0px;"> 
                <span style="font-family: Verdana;"><span style="font-size: 12px;">From: Eddie Climo</span></span></p> 
        <p style="margin: 0px; padding: 0px;"> 
                <span style="font-family: Verdana;"><span style="font-size: 12px;">Sent: 09/17/11 08:00 AM</span></span></p> 
        <p style="margin: 0px; padding: 0px;"> 
                <span style="font-family: Verdana;"><span style="font-size: 12px;">To: Standard Cornish discussion list</span></span></p> 
        <p style="margin: 0px; padding: 0px;"> 
                <span style="font-family: Verdana;"><span style="font-size: 12px;">Subject: [Spellyans] 'Tryga' - personal form</span></span></p> 
        <br> 
        <div> 
                Here's an interesting attestation of '<b>tryga</b>' being used in an inflected personal form. It's from the chorus of the traditional song 'Wembalo', as recorded by Mr.C.C.James (Old Cornwall, III 521).<br>
 
                <div> 
                         </div> 
                <div> 
                        <blockquote type="cite"> 
                                <b>'Wembalo' <i>(burdhen):</i></b></blockquote> 
                        <blockquote type="cite"> 
                                Gans ow whym wham wembalo,<br> 
                                Coweth hunek yn benbalo,<br> 
                                Meppygow yn benbalo, <br> 
                                yn blejen (a) drygons-y.</blockquote> 
                </div> 
                <div> 
                        Note that this personal form is not demanded by the song's metre: '<b>yn blejen trygys yns (y)</b>' has the same scansion. And there's no rhyme to consider with this line. It would seem to be a simple stylistic choice.</div>
 
                <div> 
                         </div> 
                <div> 
                        Of course, there's nothing wrong with '<b>trygys yu/yma trygys' </b>etc., but it seems there's another attested possibility we may use.</div> 
                <div> 
                         </div> 
                <div> 
                        Eddie Climo</div> 
        </div> 
</blockquote> 
<p style="margin: 0px; padding: 0px;"> 
         </p> 
<br> 
<br> 
<br> 
<span><span style="font-family: Verdana; font-size: 12px;">_____________________________________ <br> 
Dr. Jon Mills, <br> 
University of Kent</span></span></span></span>
<br>_______________________________________________<br>
Spellyans mailing list<br>
<a href="mailto:Spellyans@kernowek.net">Spellyans@kernowek.net</a><br>
<a href="http://kernowek.net/mailman/listinfo/spellyans_kernowek.net" target="_blank">http://kernowek.net/mailman/listinfo/spellyans_kernowek.net</a><br>
<br></blockquote></div><br>