<html><head></head><body style="word-wrap: break-word; -webkit-nbsp-mode: space; -webkit-line-break: after-white-space; "><font class="Apple-style-span" face="Georgia" size="5">Not really. If we want to say 'the Cornish Gorsedd' for example we say<i> Gorseth Kernow</i>.</font><div><font class="Apple-style-span" face="Georgia" size="5">Similarly<i> '</i>Cornish Archaeology' is <i>Hendhyscas Kernow</i>. Since, however, <i>Kernow</i> is definite,</font></div><div><font class="Apple-style-span" face="Georgia" size="5">the word before it is also definite. </font></div><div><font class="Apple-style-span" face="Georgia" size="5"><br></font></div><div><font class="Apple-style-span" face="Georgia" size="5">The only example I can think of in the texts of <i>Kernowek</i> used to mean 'of Cornwall, Cornish' is the following in a letter</font></div><div><font class="Apple-style-span" face="Georgia" size="5">from John Boson to William Gwavas dated 5 April 1710:</font></div><div><font class="Apple-style-span" face="Georgia" size="5"><i>Me ri marci dh'eu rag goz Neuodhou vorth an kenza Den Kernuak</i> 'I give thanks to you for your news about the first Cornish man'</font></div><div><font class="Apple-style-span" face="Georgia" size="5">(Padel, <i>Cornish Writings of the Boson Family</i> 46, 47).</font></div><div><font class="Apple-style-span" face="Georgia" size="5"><br></font></div><div><font class="Apple-style-span" face="Georgia" size="5">Boson's knowledge of Cornish is not perfect here. <i>Me ri</i> is very curious, for example.</font></div><div><font class="Apple-style-span" face="Georgia" size="5">The expression <i>den Kernowek</i> for 'Cornishman' is also very odd. A native speaker would, one would think, have</font></div><div><font class="Apple-style-span" face="Georgia" size="5">used <i>Kernow</i>; cf.</font></div><div><font class="Apple-style-span" face="Georgia" size="5"><br></font></div><div><font class="Apple-style-span" face="Georgia" size="5"><i>y'n gylwyr Arthur Cornow</i> 'He is called Arthur, the Cornishman' BK 1658</font></div><div><font class="Apple-style-span" face="Georgia" size="5"><i>Na thowtyans rag sham na Cornow na Scot</i> 'Let him not for shame fear either Cornishman or Scot' 2486-87.</font></div><div><font class="Apple-style-span" face="Georgia" size="5"><br></font></div><div><font class="Apple-style-span" face="Georgia" size="5">For 'Cornish' other than the language I use either <i>Kernow</i>, i.e. <i>Gorseth Kernow</i> or <i>a Gernow</i>, e.g. <i>nebes scolers a Gernow</i> 'some Cornish</font></div><div><font class="Apple-style-span" face="Georgia" size="5">scholars'. The use of <i>a Gernow </i>allows us to keep the preceding noun indefinite.</font></div><div><font class="Apple-style-span" face="Georgia" size="5"><br></font></div><div><font class="Apple-style-span" face="Georgia" size="5">If you want to say 'I am Cornish' you say <i>Kernow ov vy</i> or<i> Kernowes ov vy</i>.</font></div><div><font class="Apple-style-span" face="Georgia" size="5">'We are Cornish' is <i>Kernowyon on ny.</i></font></div><div><font class="Apple-style-span" face="Georgia" size="5"><i><br></i></font></div><div><font class="Apple-style-span" face="Georgia" size="5">Nicholas</font></div><div><br></div><div><br><div><div>On 2011 Du 22, at 19:13, Craig Weatherhill wrote:</div><br class="Apple-interchange-newline"><blockquote type="cite"><span class="Apple-style-span" style="border-collapse: separate; font-family: Helvetica; font-style: normal; font-variant: normal; font-weight: normal; letter-spacing: normal; line-height: normal; orphans: 2; text-align: -webkit-auto; text-indent: 0px; text-transform: none; white-space: normal; widows: 2; word-spacing: 0px; -webkit-border-horizontal-spacing: 0px; -webkit-border-vertical-spacing: 0px; -webkit-text-decorations-in-effect: none; -webkit-text-size-adjust: auto; -webkit-text-stroke-width: 0px; font-size: medium; ">Is there any textual evidence of "Kernowek" being used to mean 'Cornish', other than reference to the language?<br></span></blockquote></div><br></div></body></html>