<html><head></head><body style="word-wrap: break-word; -webkit-nbsp-mode: space; -webkit-line-break: after-white-space; "><div><div>On 2012 Whe 7, at 16:48, Nicholas Williams wrote:</div><blockquote type="cite"><div style="word-wrap: break-word; -webkit-nbsp-mode: space; -webkit-line-break: after-white-space; ">The form *<i>brusyas</i> was devised by Nance and first appears in his 1938 dictionary. </div></blockquote><div>Nicholas, you really should be more careful in making statements about attestation. This word actually appears 4 years earlier in Nance's 1934 dictionary:</div><div><span class="Apple-tab-span" style="white-space:pre">        </span><b>judge. </b>n. <i>brüsyas; juj</i></div><div><br></div><blockquote type="cite"><div style="word-wrap: break-word; -webkit-nbsp-mode: space; -webkit-line-break: after-white-space; ">It is not attested in traditional Cornish.</div></blockquote>Is this statement about attestation more reliable than the previous one? Let's recall what you said in 2006 about words for 'judge' in your UCR dictionary, and compare it with 2 other lexicographers:</div><div><br></div><div><div style="margin-top: 0px; margin-right: 0px; margin-bottom: 0px; margin-left: 0px; font: normal normal normal 12px/normal Helvetica; ">Nance:</div><div style="margin-top: 0px; margin-right: 0px; margin-bottom: 0px; margin-left: 0px; font: normal normal normal 12px/normal Helvetica; "><span class="Apple-tab-span" style="white-space:pre">       </span><b>judge</b> n. <i>juj, brusyth, brusyth, juster</i></div><div style="margin-top: 0px; margin-right: 0px; margin-bottom: 0px; margin-left: 0px; font: normal normal normal 12px/normal Helvetica; "><b><span class="Apple-tab-span" style="white-space:pre"> </span>justys</b> n. <i>justice, magistrate</i></div><div style="margin-top: 0px; margin-right: 0px; margin-bottom: 0px; margin-left: 0px; font: normal normal normal 12px/normal Helvetica; min-height: 14px; "><br></div><div style="margin-top: 0px; margin-right: 0px; margin-bottom: 0px; margin-left: 0px; font: normal normal normal 12px/normal Helvetica; ">NJAW 2006:</div><div style="margin-top: 0px; margin-right: 0px; margin-bottom: 0px; margin-left: 0px; font: normal normal normal 12px/normal Helvetica; "><span class="Apple-tab-span" style="white-space:pre">     </span><b>judge</b> n.<i> juj, brusyth; </i>(of competition)<i> brusyas</i></div><div style="margin-top: 0px; margin-right: 0px; margin-bottom: 0px; margin-left: 0px; font: normal normal normal 12px/normal Helvetica; "><span class="Apple-tab-span" style="font-style: italic; white-space: pre; ">       </span><b>justice</b> n. (magistrate) <i>justys</i></div><div style="margin-top: 0px; margin-right: 0px; margin-bottom: 0px; margin-left: 0px; font: normal normal normal 12px/normal Helvetica; "><b><span class="Apple-tab-span" style="white-space:pre">    </span>justiciar</b> n. juster</div><div style="margin-top: 0px; margin-right: 0px; margin-bottom: 0px; margin-left: 0px; font: normal normal normal 12px/normal Helvetica; min-height: 14px; "><br></div><div style="margin-top: 0px; margin-right: 0px; margin-bottom: 0px; margin-left: 0px; font: normal normal normal 12px/normal Helvetica; ">R.Gendall</div><div style="margin-top: 0px; margin-right: 0px; margin-bottom: 0px; margin-left: 0px; font: normal normal normal 12px/normal Helvetica; "><span class="Apple-tab-span" style="white-space:pre">   </span><b>judge</b> n. <i>barner, brezidh, juster </i>(of sport)</div><div style="margin-top: 0px; margin-right: 0px; margin-bottom: 0px; margin-left: 0px; font: normal normal normal 12px/normal Helvetica; "><br></div><div style="margin-top: 0px; margin-right: 0px; margin-bottom: 0px; margin-left: 0px; font: normal normal normal 12px/normal Helvetica; ">Nance 1938 makes no comment about the provenance of <i>'brusyas</i>'; he is normally careful to mark neologisms, calques and coinings (unlike some less meticulous lexicographers in our language).</div><div style="margin-top: 0px; margin-right: 0px; margin-bottom: 0px; margin-left: 0px; font: normal normal normal 12px/normal Helvetica; "><br></div><div style="margin-top: 0px; margin-right: 0px; margin-bottom: 0px; margin-left: 0px; font: normal normal normal 12px/normal Helvetica; ">Of course, it may be that '<i>brusyas</i>' is one of Nance's neologisms which he omitted to mark as such. If so, I find it quite acceptable, as it joins the ranks of many other agentive forms is <i>-yas</i>, with fem. ending <i>-yades, </i>such as:</div><div style="margin-top: 0px; margin-right: 0px; margin-bottom: 0px; margin-left: 0px; font: normal normal normal 12px/normal Helvetica; "><blockquote type="cite"><i>acontyas, kefrysyas, Seyskeryas, maynvrusyas, arvrusyas, cowethyas, servyas, laghyas, lewyas, Bangladeshyas, breselyas, Bengalyas, ostyas, kethservyas, Burgaynyas…</i></blockquote></div><div style="margin-top: 0px; margin-right: 0px; margin-bottom: 0px; margin-left: 0px; font: normal normal normal 12px/normal Helvetica; ">This is just a small random sample of such words, all taken from Nicholas's UCR dictionary. One might take especial note of <i>Bangladeshyas</i>; this can hardly be blamed on Nance, as the state of Bangladesh didn't exist during his lifetime! One suspects that this word was a Williamsek 'devising'.</div><div style="margin-top: 0px; margin-right: 0px; margin-bottom: 0px; margin-left: 0px; font: normal normal normal 12px/normal Helvetica; "><br></div><div style="margin-top: 0px; margin-right: 0px; margin-bottom: 0px; margin-left: 0px; font: normal normal normal 12px/normal Helvetica; "><i><b>Ewn rak an woth, ewn rak an culyek woth, ow sos!</b></i></div><div style="margin-top: 0px; margin-right: 0px; margin-bottom: 0px; margin-left: 0px; font: normal normal normal 12px/normal Helvetica; "><br></div><div style="margin-top: 0px; margin-right: 0px; margin-bottom: 0px; margin-left: 0px; font: normal normal normal 12px/normal Helvetica; ">Eddie Climo</div><div><br></div><br></div><div><br></div><br></body></html>