<span style='font-family:Verdana'><span style='font-size:12px'><p style="margin:0px; padding:0px;" > 
        I've just been reading an interesting article by Mark Sebba (<a href="http://lancaster.academia.edu/MarkSebba/Papers/1407388/_Sociolinguistic_approaches_to_writing_systems_research_._Writing_Systems_Research_1.1._35-49">http://lancaster.academia.edu/MarkSebba/Papers/1407388/_Sociolinguistic_approaches_to_writing_systems_research_._Writing_Systems_Research_1.1._35-49</a>) in which he concludes,<br /> 
        "<font face="TimesNewRomanPSMT-Roman" size="2"><font face="TimesNewRomanPSMT-Roman" size="2">One question which has never been satisfactorily </font></font><font face="TimesNewRomanPSMT-Roman" size="2"><font face="TimesNewRomanPSMT-Roman" size="2">answered is why a standardized, invariant orthography </font></font><font face="TimesNewRomanPSMT-Roman" size="2"><font face="TimesNewRomanPSMT-Roman" size="2">is necessary. But not only has this question not </font></font><font face="TimesNewRomanPSMT-Roman" size="2"><font face="TimesNewRomanPSMT-Roman" size="2">been answered, it has hardly been asked: the assumption </font></font><font face="TimesNewRomanPSMT-Roman" size="2"><font face="TimesNewRomanPSMT-Roman" size="2">is always that there ‘should be’ a standard, </font></font><font face="TimesNewRomanPSMT-Roman" size="2"><font face="TimesNewRomanPSMT-Roman" size="2">though who is responsible for providing it is clearer </font></font><font face="TimesNewRomanPSMT-Roman" size="2"><font face="TimesNewRomanPSMT-Roman" size="2">for some languages than for others. Furthermore, as </font></font><font face="TimesNewRomanPSMT-Roman" size="2"><font face="TimesNewRomanPSMT-Roman" size="2">was mentioned in Section 5, optionality is unpopular </font></font><font face="TimesNewRomanPSMT-Roman" size="2"><font face="TimesNewRomanPSMT-Roman" size="2">with users: the prevalent language ideology, at least </font></font><font face="TimesNewRomanPSMT-Roman" size="2"><font face="TimesNewRomanPSMT-Roman" size="2">in European languages, seems to favour prescription. </font></font><font face="TimesNewRomanPSMT-Roman" size="2"><font face="TimesNewRomanPSMT-Roman" size="2">Yet, historically, it seems, variability in spelling was </font></font><font face="TimesNewRomanPSMT-Roman" size="2"><font face="TimesNewRomanPSMT-Roman" size="2">not seen as a problem. </font></font><br /> 
        <font face="TimesNewRomanPSMT-Roman" size="2"><font face="TimesNewRomanPSMT-Roman" size="2">One conclusion might be that there is simply no </font></font><i><font face="TimesNewRomanPSMT-Italic" size="2"><font face="TimesNewRomanPSMT-Italic" size="2">linguistic </font></font></i><font face="TimesNewRomanPSMT-Roman" size="2"><font face="TimesNewRomanPSMT-Roman" size="2">reason why orthography should be standardized. </font></font><font face="TimesNewRomanPSMT-Roman" size="2"><font face="TimesNewRomanPSMT-Roman" size="2">According to this line of reasoning, the </font></font><font face="TimesNewRomanPSMT-Roman" size="2"><font face="TimesNewRomanPSMT-Roman" size="2">emphasis on standardization and prescription is a </font></font><font face="TimesNewRomanPSMT-Roman" size="2"><font face="TimesNewRomanPSMT-Roman" size="2">purely social and cultural phenomenon. However, </font></font><font face="TimesNewRomanPSMT-Roman" size="2"><font face="TimesNewRomanPSMT-Roman" size="2">there is at least an alternative possibility: historically, </font></font><font face="TimesNewRomanPSMT-Roman" size="2"><font face="TimesNewRomanPSMT-Roman" size="2">literacy (at least in the sense of ‘ability to read and </font></font><font face="TimesNewRomanPSMT-Roman" size="2"><font face="TimesNewRomanPSMT-Roman" size="2">write’) has become more pervasive, and the </font></font><i><font face="TimesNewRomanPSMT-Italic" size="2"><font face="TimesNewRomanPSMT-Italic" size="2">need </font></font></i><font face="TimesNewRomanPSMT-Roman" size="2"><font face="TimesNewRomanPSMT-Roman" size="2">for individuals to read and write has increased, </font></font><font face="TimesNewRomanPSMT-Roman" size="2"><font face="TimesNewRomanPSMT-Roman" size="2">at least in industrialized countries and contexts. </font></font><font face="TimesNewRomanPSMT-Roman" size="2"><font face="TimesNewRomanPSMT-Roman" size="2">So could standardization offer a benefit in terms of </font></font><font face="TimesNewRomanPSMT-Roman" size="2"><font face="TimesNewRomanPSMT-Roman" size="2">efficiency, either for readers or writers? Are unstandardized </font></font><font face="TimesNewRomanPSMT-Roman" size="2"><font face="TimesNewRomanPSMT-Roman" size="2">language varieties, where the same word </font></font><font face="TimesNewRomanPSMT-Roman" size="2"><font face="TimesNewRomanPSMT-Roman" size="2">could appear in many different forms, actually less </font></font><font face="TimesNewRomanPSMT-Roman" size="2"><font face="TimesNewRomanPSMT-Roman" size="2">easy to read (or to write) than languages where each </font></font><font face="TimesNewRomanPSMT-Roman" size="2"><font face="TimesNewRomanPSMT-Roman" size="2">word has only one form? Is there some sense in which </font></font><font face="TimesNewRomanPSMT-Roman" size="2"><font face="TimesNewRomanPSMT-Roman" size="2">invariance really is linguistically desirable, rather </font></font><font face="TimesNewRomanPSMT-Roman" size="2"><font face="TimesNewRomanPSMT-Roman" size="2">than just preferred by the dominant linguistic culture? </font></font><font face="TimesNewRomanPSMT-Roman" size="2"><font face="TimesNewRomanPSMT-Roman" size="2">This is a question which could be answered </font></font><font face="TimesNewRomanPSMT-Roman" size="2"><font face="TimesNewRomanPSMT-Roman" size="2">experimentally from outside of sociolinguistics, </font></font><font face="TimesNewRomanPSMT-Roman" size="2"><font face="TimesNewRomanPSMT-Roman" size="2">and the answer would contribute to an understanding </font></font><font face="TimesNewRomanPSMT-Roman" size="2"><font face="TimesNewRomanPSMT-Roman" size="2">of the relationship between literacy and writing </font></font><font face="TimesNewRomanPSMT-Roman" size="2"><font face="TimesNewRomanPSMT-Roman" size="2">systems."</font></font></p> 
<br /> 
Ol an gwella,<br /> 
Jon<br /> 
<br /> 
<span id="editor_signature"><span style="font-family: Verdana; font-size: 12px">_____________________________________ <br /> 
Dr. Jon Mills, <br /> 
University of Kent</span></span></span></span>