<html><head></head><body style="word-wrap: break-word; -webkit-nbsp-mode: space; -webkit-line-break: after-white-space; "><div>I've always said [ˈbiːɐn] and incidentally it's also the pronunciation in many Breton dialects…</div><div>Dan</div><div><br></div><br><div><div>On Feb 12, 2012, at 5:23 PM, Nicholas Williams wrote:</div><br class="Apple-interchange-newline"><blockquote type="cite"><div style="word-wrap: break-word; -webkit-nbsp-mode: space; -webkit-line-break: after-white-space; "><font class="Apple-style-span" face="Georgia" size="5">Nance wrote <i><b>byghan</b></i> for 'small' and George followed him. In my view the spelling <byghan> was not sensible. Here is a short quotation from a forthcoming handbook of mine:</font><div><font class="Apple-style-span" face="Georgia" size="5"><br></font></div><div><div style="margin-top: 0px; margin-right: 0px; margin-bottom: 0px; margin-left: 0px; font: normal normal normal 10px/normal Helvetica; "><font class="Apple-style-span" face="Georgia" size="5">For ‘small, little’ in revived Cornish some speakers use the word <i><b>byghan</b></i>.</font></div><div style="margin-top: 0px; margin-right: 0px; margin-bottom: 0px; margin-left: 0px; font: normal normal normal 10px/normal Helvetica; "><font class="Apple-style-span" face="Georgia" size="5">It should be pointed out, however, that this form is not attested in the</font></div><div style="margin-top: 0px; margin-right: 0px; margin-bottom: 0px; margin-left: 0px; font: normal normal normal 10px/normal Helvetica; "><font class="Apple-style-span" face="Georgia" size="5">Cornish texts, though it does occur in place-names. Two examples of</font></div><div style="margin-top: 0px; margin-right: 0px; margin-bottom: 0px; margin-left: 0px; font: normal normal normal 10px/normal Helvetica; "><font class="Apple-style-span" face="Georgia" size="5"><i><b>beghan</b></i>  in<i> Pascon agan Arluth</i>  are the only examples in the texts of a medial</font></div><div style="margin-top: 0px; margin-right: 0px; margin-bottom: 0px; margin-left: 0px; font: normal normal normal 10px/normal Helvetica; "><font class="Apple-style-span" face="Georgia" size="5">-<i><b>gh</b></i>-  in this word. There are a few examples of <i><b>byhan</b></i>  and <i><b>behan</b></i> , with</font></div><div style="margin-top: 0px; margin-right: 0px; margin-bottom: 0px; margin-left: 0px; font: normal normal normal 10px/normal Helvetica; "><font class="Apple-style-span" face="Georgia" size="5">medial <i><b>-h</b></i>- . By far the commonest spellings for ‘small’ in early Middle</font></div><div style="margin-top: 0px; margin-right: 0px; margin-bottom: 0px; margin-left: 0px; font: normal normal normal 10px/normal Helvetica; "><font class="Apple-style-span" face="Georgia" size="5">Cornish, however, are <i><b>byan</b></i>  or <b><i>byen</i></b> . TH and CW write this form <i><b>bean</b></i>,</font></div><div style="margin-top: 0px; margin-right: 0px; margin-bottom: 0px; margin-left: 0px; font: normal normal normal 10px/normal Helvetica; "><font class="Apple-style-span" face="Georgia" size="5">while Lhuyd writes <i><b>bîan</b></i>  passim. This is an important point: it is apparent</font></div><div style="margin-top: 0px; margin-right: 0px; margin-bottom: 0px; margin-left: 0px; font: normal normal normal 10px/normal Helvetica; "><font class="Apple-style-span" face="Georgia" size="5">that the pronunciation of this word in Middle an Late Cornish was [ˈbiːən]</font></div><div style="margin-top: 0px; margin-right: 0px; margin-bottom: 0px; margin-left: 0px; font: normal normal normal 10px/normal Helvetica; "><font class="Apple-style-span" face="Georgia" size="5">rather than *[ˈbɪxən]. There is no need, therefore, to attempt in this word</font></div><div style="margin-top: 0px; margin-right: 0px; margin-bottom: 0px; margin-left: 0px; font: normal normal normal 10px/normal Helvetica; "><font class="Apple-style-span" face="Georgia" size="5">to pronounce -gh-  [x] between vowels, a sound which is difficult for many</font></div><div style="margin-top: 0px; margin-right: 0px; margin-bottom: 0px; margin-left: 0px; font: normal normal normal 10px/normal Helvetica; "><font class="Apple-style-span" face="Georgia" size="5">speakers of English</font></div></div><div style="margin-top: 0px; margin-right: 0px; margin-bottom: 0px; margin-left: 0px; font: normal normal normal 10px/normal Helvetica; "><font class="Apple-style-span" face="Georgia" size="5"><br></font></div><div style="margin-top: 0px; margin-right: 0px; margin-bottom: 0px; margin-left: 0px; font: normal normal normal 10px/normal Helvetica; "><font class="Apple-style-span" face="Georgia" size="5">Nicholas</font></div><div><br></div><div><br><div><div>On 12 Feb 2012, at 15:49, Ray Chubb wrote:</div><br class="Apple-interchange-newline"><blockquote type="cite">I can't say that I have ever heard Mick pronounce 'byan' in that way.  Perhaps there was a certain amount of distortion through the radio.  One thing I have noticed about Mick's pronunciation is that it has a distinct Breton twang, I asked him about this and he thinks it probably goes back to his time as a child in St Ives when he used to swim out to the Breton fishing boats, be invited on board and listen to Breton being spoken.</blockquote></div><br></div></div>_______________________________________________<br>Spellyans mailing list<br><a href="mailto:Spellyans@kernowek.net">Spellyans@kernowek.net</a><br>http://kernowek.net/mailman/listinfo/spellyans_kernowek.net<br></blockquote></div><br></body></html>