<html><head></head><body style="word-wrap: break-word; -webkit-nbsp-mode: space; -webkit-line-break: after-white-space; "><div><div>I think there would be a distinction of meaning between:</div><div><br></div><div><b>Gol Ya</b> <span class="Apple-tab-span" style="white-space:pre">                     </span>- the festival of the person, St. Ives, and</div><div><b>Gol Porth Ya <span class="Apple-tab-span" style="white-space:pre">    </span></b>- the festival of the place, St. Ives.</div><div><br></div><div>It seems unlikely that many of the inhabitant or visitor in the Town St. Ives would intend to celebrate a long-dead saint. Instead, I imagine they'd be enjoying  the secular celebrations in the town of St. Ives.</div><div><br></div><div>After all, hagiolatry pretty much died out in Cornwall with the Reformation and the rise of Protestantism. Does anyone in St.Ives today have a shrine in their home to the eponymous saint, with candles and incense burning 24/7, I wonder?</div><div><br></div><div><b>Gol Porth Ya</b> would get my vote for the present-day secular festival; <b>Gol Ya</b> is what might be celebrated in the local Catholic church perhaps.</div><div><br></div><div>Eddie Climo</div><div><br></div><div>On 2012 Mer 12, at 16:09, <a href="mailto:deliabrotherton@aol.com">deliabrotherton@aol.com</a> wrote:</div><blockquote type="cite"><font face="Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif" style="color: black; font-family: arial; font-size: small; ">So "Golya" then</font><font>?</font></blockquote></div><br></body></html>