<html><head></head><body style="word-wrap: break-word; -webkit-nbsp-mode: space; -webkit-line-break: after-white-space; ">Does anyone have any thoughts on the Cornish word for a <b>score/to score</b> (in music)?<div><br></div><div>Neither Nance, Williams, Kennedy nor Gendall seem to have anything for this concept. MAGA's SWF-M <i>School Dictionary</i> has this in its thematic list of musical terms:</div><div><br></div><div><blockquote type="cite"> Music/Ilow:<b> score. </b><i>skot</i></blockquote><br></div><div>However, this has to be a malapropism. Nance, Williams, Kennedy and Gendall are all quite clear that K. <b>scot</b> refers to a a financial idea, such as a bill or tavern reckoning (similar, of course, to its meaning in English expressions such as 'pay the scot' or 'scot-free').</div><div><br></div><div>Welsh seems to have had problems with musical scores as well, The <i>Geiriadur Mawr</i> only offers<b><i> </i>cerddoriaeth</b> (which really refers to music), and <b>sgr</b> (clearly a loan). The <i>Geiriadur Prifysgol</i> gives <b>sgr</b> and the verb <b>sgoria</b>. Both agree that this loan covers both musical and sporting scores.</div><div><br></div><div>Sure, we can use something like <b>musyk scryfys</b> or Nicholas's UCR offerings:</div><div><blockquote type="cite"><b>orchestrate.</b> <i>v. </i>desedha rag orchestra; orchestratya</blockquote></div><div><blockquote type="cite"><b>sheet music.</b> <i>n.</i><i style="font-weight: bold; "> </i>ylow war folennow</blockquote></div><div>On this basis, perhaps <b>desedhyans</b> might be stretched to do service for 'musical arrangement; orchestration'.</div><div><br></div><div>Does that suffice, or do we need to borrow <b>*scor/*scorya</b> like the Welsh did?</div><div><br></div><div>regards,</div><div><br></div><div>Eddie Climo</div></body></html>