<html><head></head><body style="word-wrap: break-word; -webkit-nbsp-mode: space; -webkit-line-break: after-white-space; "><div>Consider these pairs of words in Cornish, both in their root and lenited forms:</div><div><span class="Apple-tab-span" style="white-space:pre">    </span><b>glas / gw·las<span class="Apple-tab-span" style="white-space:pre">      </span>><span class="Apple-tab-span" style="white-space:pre">        </span>las / w·las</b></div><div><b><span class="Apple-tab-span" style="white-space:pre">       </span>glan / gw·lan<span class="Apple-tab-span" style="white-space:pre">       </span>><span class="Apple-tab-span" style="white-space:pre">        </span>lan / w·lan</b></div><div><b><span class="Apple-tab-span" style="white-space:pre">       </span>grys / gw·rys<span class="Apple-tab-span" style="white-space:pre">       </span>><span class="Apple-tab-span" style="white-space:pre">        </span>rys / w·rys</b></div><div>I believe that none of the pairs are homophonic, a view supported by the spellings: the <b><w></b> isn't there by accident! Each of the words has a long final vowel, which is where the stress would lie (as indicated by the raised full-stop).</div><div><br></div><div>So I agree with Craig's description (from toponymic sources) of the <b><w></b> syllable as being short and unstressed (which is just what we hear with the cognates in Welsh, each of which has a short 1st syllable and a long stressed 2nd one: <b>gw·lad, gw·lan</b>).</div><div><br></div><div>Eddie Climo</div><br><div><div>On 2012 Ebr 10, at 10:15, Craig Weatherhill wrote:</div><br class="Apple-interchange-newline"><blockquote type="cite"><div>How was the GWL 'gwlas' pronounced?  And the WL of its lenited form?<br><br>The following historic spellings for 'Land's End' are of interest:  Pen an ulays 1504;  Penwolase c.1540; Pedden an Wolas, Pedn a Wollaz c. 1680; Pedn an Woolaes 1754.  (The <ay> of 1504, and <ae> of 1754 are the Late Cornish long A, like the <ai> of "air").<br><br>The 1504 <ulays> suggests to me that -las might have been preceded by a very short, or weak, "oo" sound, as in "wool", perhaps as briefly spoken as the Y of <yma>.  What do others think?</div></blockquote></div></body></html>