<html><head><base href="x-msg://39/"></head><body style="word-wrap: break-word; -webkit-nbsp-mode: space; -webkit-line-break: after-white-space; "><div>On 2012 Ebr 24, at 16:00, Ken MacKinnon wrote:</div><div><blockquote type="cite"><span class="Apple-style-span" style="color: rgb(31, 73, 125); font-family: Calibri, sans-serif; font-size: 15px; ">…I have in fact been reading this as a seven-beat line.</span></blockquote></div><div><br></div><div>And I think you're quite right to do so, Ken. The main metrical consideration is <u>not</u> tne number of syllables, but the beat. As I think best in terms of music notation, this example should clarify my point:</div><div><img id="cb333473-7714-4458-81ce-4ecf1378ff58" height="181" width="760" apple-width="yes" apple-height="yes" src="cid:DFB716D7-8059-4934-BC24-6935065607D8"></div><div>Here we clearly have a 7-beat 'bar'—or line—of the poem, which contains 8 'notes'—or syllables. In it we see the word '<b>gulas</b>' pronounced with the rhythm of the so-called 'Scots snap', a well-known rhythmical feature which could just as well be called the 'Kernewek snap', as it's found in quite a few Cornish disyllables with terminal stress (one of them being '<b>gulas</b>').</div><div><br></div><div>Eddie Climos</div><div><br></div><div>ps. I apologise that my music typesetting software is not Unicode savvy enough to let me use 'yogh'.</div></body></html>