<div class="gmail_extra">I think that as long as we're not planning on printing and publishing everything that goes on in this group that we can use any modern grapheme for outdated and cumbersome yogh, as long as we're clear about what we mean by the grapheme in question. Be it through footnote, transcription or common sense.</div>
<div class="gmail_extra"><br></div><div class="gmail_extra">Kind regards,</div><div class="gmail_extra"><br></div><div class="gmail_extra">Linus<br><br><div class="gmail_quote">2012/4/25 Michael Everson <span dir="ltr"><<a href="mailto:everson@evertype.com" target="_blank">everson@evertype.com</a>></span><br>
<blockquote class="gmail_quote" style="margin:0 0 0 .8ex;border-left:1px #ccc solid;padding-left:1ex"><div class="im">On 25 Apr 2012, at 13:45, Jon Mills wrote:<br>
<br>
> I interpret this grapheme as yogh when it represents /j/ but as <z> when it represents /ɵ/ or /ð/.<br>
<br>
</div>That's a bad idea.<br>
<br>
In modern Scots, there is a grapheme which sometimes represents /j/ and sometimes represents /x/. It is yogh. It is not two different characters.<br>
<br>
In English and in Cornish, there is a grapheme which sometimes represents /k/ and sometimes represents /s/. It is cee. It is not two different characters.<br>
<div class="HOEnZb"><div class="h5"><br>
Michael Everson * <a href="http://www.evertype.com/" target="_blank">http://www.evertype.com/</a><br>
<br>
<br>
_______________________________________________<br>
Spellyans mailing list<br>
<a href="mailto:Spellyans@kernowek.net">Spellyans@kernowek.net</a><br>
<a href="http://kernowek.net/mailman/listinfo/spellyans_kernowek.net" target="_blank">http://kernowek.net/mailman/listinfo/spellyans_kernowek.net</a><br>
</div></div></blockquote></div><br></div>