<html><head></head><body style="word-wrap: break-word; -webkit-nbsp-mode: space; -webkit-line-break: after-white-space; "><div>In that case, why do we bother with consistency at all, why not take the best, most frequent, or whatever attested spelling and use that and not worry about pronunciation too much. UC did this. UC's failure to adapt to the speakers' desires to based the phonology on recommended pronunciation lead to the threefold split in the 1980s…</div><div>I have no problem writing ‹<b>merh</b>› and ‹<b>cleath</b>›, but what of those who want to say /mœrθ/ and /klœːð/?</div><div>Dan</div><div><br></div><br><div><div>On May 15, 2012, at 3:05 PM, Nicholas Williams wrote:</div><br class="Apple-interchange-newline"><blockquote type="cite"><div style="word-wrap: break-word; -webkit-nbsp-mode: space; -webkit-line-break: after-white-space; "><font class="Apple-style-span" face="Georgia" size="5">Hear! Hear! And the same is true for 'March' and 'Tuesday'. These should be spelt in the revived language with the attested vowel:  <b>mis Merth</b> and <b>de Merth</b>. Anything else is speculative rather than authentic.</font><div><font class="Apple-style-span" face="Georgia" size="5"><br></font></div><div><font class="Apple-style-span" face="Georgia" size="5">Nicholas</font></div><div><br><div><div>On 15 May 2012, at 12:25, Jon Mills wrote:</div><br class="Apple-interchange-newline"><blockquote type="cite"><span class="Apple-style-span" style="border-collapse: separate; font-family: Helvetica; font-style: normal; font-variant: normal; font-weight: normal; letter-spacing: normal; line-height: normal; orphans: 2; text-align: -webkit-auto; text-indent: 0px; text-transform: none; white-space: normal; widows: 2; word-spacing: 0px; -webkit-border-horizontal-spacing: 0px; -webkit-border-vertical-spacing: 0px; -webkit-text-decorations-in-effect: none; -webkit-text-size-adjust: auto; -webkit-text-stroke-width: 0px; font-size: medium; "><span class="Apple-style-span" style="font-family: Verdana; font-size: 12px; ">And even if scholars were to agree today regarding such a conjecture, ideas of this nature are likely to change at some point in the future. Thus we are building castles on the sand if we construct our orthography on such conjectural reconstruction of phonology. The Cornish attestations all have <e> or <ea>. It is better, therefore, to spell this word <cledh>.</span></span></blockquote></div></div></div></blockquote></div><br></body></html>