<html><head></head><body style="word-wrap: break-word; -webkit-nbsp-mode: space; -webkit-line-break: after-white-space; "><div><br></div><div>From the online etymological dictionary:</div><div><span class="Apple-style-span" style="font-family: Georgia, Garamond, 'Times New Roman', Times, serif; font-size: 16px; "><dt class="highlight" style="background-color: rgb(221, 217, 202); margin-left: 0px; padding-top: 0px; padding-right: 0.5em; padding-bottom: 0px; padding-left: 0.5em; "><a href="http://www.etymonline.com/index.php?term=Welsh&allowed_in_frame=0" style="color: rgb(128, 0, 32); text-decoration: none; font-weight: bold; ">Welsh</a> <a href="http://dictionary.reference.com/search?q=Welsh" class="dictionary" title="Look up Welsh at Dictionary.com" style="color: rgb(128, 0, 32); text-decoration: none; font-weight: bold; font-style: italic; font-size: xx-small; margin-left: 1em; "><img width="16" height="16" alt="Look up Welsh at Dictionary.com" title="Look up Welsh at Dictionary.com" style="border-top-width: 0px; border-right-width: 0px; border-bottom-width: 0px; border-left-width: 0px; border-style: initial; border-color: initial; vertical-align: middle; " id="a3648230-f2d6-413e-adb5-8adf03dea61b" apple-width="yes" apple-height="yes" src="cid:6B34955E-2E5B-462D-9D81-4B92D3AD2E8D@HotelGollner"></a></dt><dd class="highlight" style="background-color: rgb(221, 217, 202); margin-left: 0px; padding-top: 0px; padding-right: 0.5em; padding-bottom: 0.5em; padding-left: 0.5em; ">O.E. <span class="foreign" style="font-style: italic; ">Wilisc, Wylisc</span> (W.Saxon), <span class="foreign" style="font-style: italic; ">Welisc, Wælisc</span> (Anglian and Kentish), from <span class="foreign" style="font-style: italic; ">Wealh, Walh</span> "Celt, Briton, Welshman, non-Germanic foreigner;" in Tolkien's definition, "common Gmc. name for a man of what we should call Celtic speech," but also applied to speakers of Latin, hence O.H.G. <span class="foreign" style="font-style: italic; ">Walh, Walah</span> "Celt, Roman, Gaulish," and O.N. <span class="foreign" style="font-style: italic; ">Valir</span> "Gauls, Frenchmen" (Dan. <span class="foreign" style="font-style: italic; ">vælsk</span>"Italian, French, southern"); from P.Gmc. <span class="foreign" style="font-style: italic; ">*Walkhiskaz</span>, from a Celtic name represented by L. <span class="foreign" style="font-style: italic; ">Volcæ</span> (Caesar) "ancient Celtic tribe in southern Gaul." The word survives in <span class="foreign" style="font-style: italic; ">Wales, Cornwall, Walloon, walnut</span>, and in surnames <span class="foreign" style="font-style: italic; ">Walsh</span> and <span class="foreign" style="font-style: italic; ">Wallace</span>. Borrowed in O.C.S. as <span class="foreign" style="font-style: italic; ">vlachu</span>, and applied to Romanians, hence <span class="foreign" style="font-style: italic; ">Wallachia</span>. Among the English, <span class="foreign" style="font-style: italic; ">Welsh</span> was used disparagingly of inferior or substitute things, hence <span class="foreign" style="font-style: italic; ">Welsh rabbit</span> (1725), also perverted by folk-etymology as <span class="foreign" style="font-style: italic; ">Welsh rarebit</span> (1785).</dd></span><div><br></div></div><div>Dan</div><br><div><div>On May 24, 2012, at 8:19 AM, Craig Weatherhill wrote:</div><br class="Apple-interchange-newline"><blockquote type="cite"><div>English may not be German per se, but it is a Germanic language in origin.  Compare Anglo-Saxon with Frisian (Garry Funk gave me a Frisian phrase book and it's amazing how closely related the two are, even after centuries).  As to the dictionary, do we know that the meanings given are correct, or Clark-Hall's interpretation 1500-1000 years on?<br><br>It's also possible that the term originally meant "Celtic speakers", but was later extended in meaning.<br><br>Consider this as regards: Walnut.   A walnut resembles a skull which can be opened to reveal something that looks remarkably like a brain.  The Celts of the Iron Age/Roman and post-Roman periods were well known for their custom of taking the heads of their enemies.<br><br>Craig<br><br><br></div></blockquote></div><br></body></html>