<html><head></head><body style="word-wrap: break-word; -webkit-nbsp-mode: space; -webkit-line-break: after-white-space; "><div><div><font class="Apple-style-span" face="Georgia" size="5">I genuinely believe that there was a systematic opposition in Cornish after the PS between </font></div><div><font class="Apple-style-span" face="Georgia" size="5">unstressed vowel + voiceless consonant and stressed vowel + voiced consonant.</font></div><div><font class="Apple-style-span" face="Georgia" size="5">This is why I refuse to write <i>genev</i>, <i>orthiv</i>, <i>myghternedh</i>, <i>menedh</i>, etc. It is one of the reasons that prevent me from</font></div><div><font class="Apple-style-span" face="Georgia" size="5">embracing the SWF in its present form.</font></div><div><font class="Apple-style-span" face="Georgia" size="5"><br></font></div><div><font class="Apple-style-span" face="Georgia" size="5">It must be admitted, however, that there are exceptions to the stressed -eg ~ unstressed ek rule. Dan has rightly pointed out</font></div><div><font class="Apple-style-span" face="Georgia" size="5"><i>gorryb</i> and <i>marreg</i>. To be fair I discuss <i>gorryb</i> in CT 8.14.</font></div><div><font class="Apple-style-span" face="Georgia" size="5"><br></font></div><div><font class="Apple-style-span" face="Georgia" size="5">Quite probably some will be unconvinced by my suggestion that the voiceless <i>r</i> in <i>gorryb</i></font></div><div><font class="Apple-style-span" face="Georgia" size="5">dissimilated the voiceless final to voiced. The same people will refuse to believe, no doubt,</font></div><div><font class="Apple-style-span" face="Georgia" size="5">that <i>marreg</i> is for <i>marheg</i> with a similar dissimilation.</font></div><div><font class="Apple-style-span" face="Georgia" size="5"><br></font></div><div><font class="Apple-style-span" face="Georgia" size="5">It must be admitted, however, that the overwhelming majority of words in unstressed -ek, -ak, -yk, etc.</font></div><div><font class="Apple-style-span" face="Georgia" size="5">have a voiceless final and those with a stressed vowel tend in the later texts are written with <g>, etc.</font></div><div><font class="Apple-style-span" face="Georgia" size="5"><br></font></div><div><font class="Apple-style-span" face="Georgia" size="5">I have already drawn attention to the anomalous forms:</font></div><div><font class="Apple-style-span" face="Georgia" size="5"><br></font></div><div><font class="Apple-style-span" face="Georgia" size="5"><i>dyag</i>, <i>nownsag</i>, <i>methag</i>, <i>bothorag</i>, <i>golag</i>, <i>yddrag</i>/<i>eddrag</i> and <i>kronag</i>.</font></div><div><font class="Apple-style-span" face="Georgia" size="5">I have no explanation for <i>dyag</i>, <i>nownsag</i>, <i>methag</i>. <i>Methek</i>, <i>methak</i> 'doctor' is attested at least 6 times to methag once.</font></div><div><font class="Apple-style-span" face="Georgia" size="5">Moreover Pryce gives <i>nawnzack</i>. </font></div><div><font class="Apple-style-span" face="Georgia" size="5"><br></font></div><div><font class="Apple-style-span" face="Georgia" size="5"> <i>Eddrag</i> may well have been contaminated by <i>edrega</i>.</font></div><div><font class="Apple-style-span" face="Georgia" size="5"><br></font></div><div><font class="Apple-style-span" face="Georgia" size="5">The other three <i>bothorag</i>, <i>golag</i> and <i>kranag</i> all have a sonant r, l, and n immediately before the </font><span class="Apple-style-span" style="font-family: Georgia; font-size: x-large; ">final unstressed syllable. </span></div><div><font class="Apple-style-span" face="Georgia" size="5">It must also be admitted that for <i>bothorag</i>, <i>golag</i> and <i>kranag</i> voiceless finals are also  attested, i.e. <i>bothorak</i>, <i>cronek</i> and <i>golok/golak</i>.</font></div><div><font class="Apple-style-span" face="Georgia" size="5">I wonder whether the sonant in any of these cases might for whatever reason have been rh, nh and lh rather than than simple r, n and l.</font></div><div><font class="Apple-style-span" face="Georgia" size="5">We have excellent evidence that voiceless rh, nh and lh all existed in Cornish.</font></div><div><font class="Apple-style-span" face="Georgia" size="5">In which case, if our sources are reliable, we may be looking at a voiceless > voiced dissimilation in all three.</font></div><div><font class="Apple-style-span" face="Georgia" size="5"><br></font></div><div><font class="Apple-style-span" face="Georgia" size="5">It must be admitted that gorryb, marreg, etc. are edge cases, and that the fundament distribution voiceless+k ~ voiced+g holds </font></div><div><font class="Apple-style-span" face="Georgia" size="5">in the overwhelming majority of cases. </font></div><div><font class="Apple-style-span" face="Georgia" size="5"><br></font></div><div><font class="Apple-style-span" face="Georgia" size="5">There is not the faintest whiff of a hint that forms like gorryb, marreg, golag are sandhi phenomena. </font></div><div><font class="Apple-style-span" face="Georgia" size="5">Apart from these apparently anomalous forms, all -ek, -ak words retain -ek, -ak before vowels as well as consonants.</font></div><div><font class="Apple-style-span" face="Georgia" size="5"><br></font></div><div><font class="Apple-style-span" face="Georgia" size="5">Nicholas</font></div><div><br></div></div></body></html>