<html><head></head><body style="word-wrap: break-word; -webkit-nbsp-mode: space; -webkit-line-break: after-white-space; "><div><b><font class="Apple-style-span" face="Verdana">Craig, </font></b></div><div><b><font class="Apple-style-span" face="Verdana">I would surmise that ‹scowl› /skɔʊl/ is correct. There is also an Old Breton attestation ‹scubl› which shows a consonant before the /l/ similar to the Welsh ‹f›, probably /v/. The Cornish /o/ rather than /u/ as in Breton and Welsh would be a regular development as well as the vocalisation of /v/ to /w/. Compare the word ‹dowr›…</font></b></div><div><b><font class="Apple-style-span" face="Verdana">Dan</font></b></div><div><b><font class="Apple-style-span" face="Verdana"><br></font></b></div><b><font class="Apple-style-span" face="Verdana"><br></font></b><div><div><b><font class="Apple-style-span" face="Verdana">On Oct 1, 2012, at 1:28 PM, Craig Weatherhill wrote:</font></b></div><br class="Apple-interchange-newline"><blockquote type="cite"><div>The SWF dictionary has <skowl>.  This is wrong.  The vowel is <ou>, not <ow>, the same as <tour> and <Loundres>.<br><br>The only place-name that features it (Treskillard), has: -scul (1327, 1342, 1428); -skul- 1333;  -scul (1356); -skeul- (1490); and -stul (for -skul-, 1566).<br>OCV 498 has:  scoul.<br>Breton has:  skoul.<br>Welsh has: ysgwfl.<br><br>Craig<br></div></blockquote></div><br></body></html>