<html><head></head><body style="word-wrap: break-word; -webkit-nbsp-mode: space; -webkit-line-break: after-white-space; "><div>The American OED has the definition</div><div><blockquote type="cite"><b>ballroom dancing</b>. formal social dancing in couples…</blockquote><br>That suggests something like '<b>donsya furfvus/furvek</b>'. Alternatively, UCR has '<b>hel donsya</b>' for a ballroom; simply inverting it to '<b>donsya hel</b>' might do the trick, or following some of the models below, we might have '<b>donsya salon</b>' (UCR does offer this latter word)</div><div><br></div><div>Using Wikipedia's entries on the subject, we find that other languages include the following terms: <b>Standardtânze</b> (German), <b>Danse de salon</b> (French), <b>Baile de salón</b> (Galician, Spanish), <b>Stijldans</b> (Dutch), <b>Dansuri de societate</b> (Romanian).</div><div><br></div><div>Eddie Climo</div><div><br></div><br><div><div>On 2012 Hed 1, at 13:31, Jon Mills wrote:</div><br class="Apple-interchange-newline"><blockquote type="cite"><span style="font-family:Verdana"><span style="font-size:12px"><br> 
Thank you to everyone who has made suggestions for "ballroom". I take Michael's point that semantic distinctions are not necessarily made in all languages. And maybe Cornish does not need to distinguish between "ballroom" and "dance hall". However, my inquiry was for a translation of "ballroom dancing". Suppose, for example, one wanted to announce "ballroom dancing classes". This would require a semantic distinction to convey the particular genre of dance (i.e. "ballroom dancing" not "morris-dancing", etc.). I suppose one could borrow the English word to create "dauns-ballroom". But I suspect such a borrowing would not be popular. Any further suggestions?<br> 
Ol an gwella,<br> 
Jon</span></span><br></blockquote></div><br></body></html>