<html><head></head><body style="word-wrap: break-word; -webkit-nbsp-mode: space; -webkit-line-break: after-white-space; "><font class="Apple-style-span" face="Verdana" size="4">The word enuedzhek occurs once only as far as I can see. It is found in Lhuyd's preface to his Cornish grammar AB: 222</font><div><font class="Apple-style-span" face="Verdana" size="4">where he says: </font></div><div><font class="Apple-style-span" face="Verdana" size="4"><br></font></div><div><font class="Apple-style-span" face="Verdana" size="4">dhort genauo an bôbl en Gorleuen Kernou en enuedzhek en pleu Yst 'from the mouths of the people in the West of Cornwall, especially in the parish of St Just'</font><div style="margin-top: 0px; margin-right: 0px; margin-bottom: 0px; margin-left: 0px; font: normal normal normal 12px/normal Helvetica; "><font class="Apple-style-span" face="Verdana" size="4"><br></font></div><div style="margin-top: 0px; margin-right: 0px; margin-bottom: 0px; margin-left: 0px; font: normal normal normal 12px/normal Helvetica; "><font class="Apple-style-span" face="Verdana" size="4">A variant form anuezek occurs a little later on the same page where Lhuyd writes:</font></div><div style="margin-top: 0px; margin-right: 0px; margin-bottom: 0px; margin-left: 0px; font: normal normal normal 12px/normal Helvetica; "><font class="Apple-style-span" face="Verdana" size="4"><br></font></div><div style="margin-top: 0px; margin-right: 0px; margin-bottom: 0px; margin-left: 0px; font: normal normal normal 12px/normal Helvetica; "><div style="margin-top: 0px; margin-right: 0px; margin-bottom: 0px; margin-left: 0px; font: normal normal normal 12px/normal Helvetica; "><font class="Apple-style-span" face="Verdana" size="4">en anuezek Mr. John Keyguyn a’n Tshei izala en Por Enez 'especially Mr John Keigwin of the Lower House in Mousehole'</font></div><div style="margin-top: 0px; margin-right: 0px; margin-bottom: 0px; margin-left: 0px; font: normal normal normal 12px/normal Helvetica; "><font class="Apple-style-span" face="Verdana" size="4"><br></font></div><div style="margin-top: 0px; margin-right: 0px; margin-bottom: 0px; margin-left: 0px; font: normal normal normal 12px/normal Helvetica; "><font class="Apple-style-span" face="Verdana" size="4">enuedzhek, anuezek are Lhuyd's Cornicisations of Welsh enwedig 'special, particular'.</font></div><div style="margin-top: 0px; margin-right: 0px; margin-bottom: 0px; margin-left: 0px; font: normal normal normal 12px/normal Helvetica; "><font class="Apple-style-span" face="Verdana" size="4">The word has nothing to do with inwedh 'also'.</font></div><div style="margin-top: 0px; margin-right: 0px; margin-bottom: 0px; margin-left: 0px; font: normal normal normal 12px/normal Helvetica; "><font class="Apple-style-span" face="Verdana" size="4"><br></font></div><div style="margin-top: 0px; margin-right: 0px; margin-bottom: 0px; margin-left: 0px; font: normal normal normal 12px/normal Helvetica; "><font class="Apple-style-span" face="Verdana" size="4">Nicholas</font></div><div style="margin-top: 0px; margin-right: 0px; margin-bottom: 0px; margin-left: 0px; font: normal normal normal 12px/normal Helvetica; "><br></div></div><div><div>On 6 Oct 2012, at 19:00, Daniel Prohaska wrote:</div><br class="Apple-interchange-newline"><blockquote type="cite"><div>I've been wondering about the word ‹<i>enuedzhek</i>› which is found in Pryce's Archaeologia Cornu-Britannica. RLC dictionaries list is variously as ‹<i>enwedgak</i>›, ‹<i>enwejak</i>› and ‹<i>enwedzhek</i>›. Gendall glosses it as 'particular, distinct, individual', and gives a Lhuydian attestation ‹<i>enụedzhek</i>› which I am unable to find. Ken George emends it to ‹<i>ynwedhek</i>› meaning 'additional'. I would very much appreciate opinions from whoever feels he or she can comment on this word. </div><br class="Apple-interchange-newline"></blockquote></div><br></div></body></html>