<html><head></head><body style="word-wrap: break-word; -webkit-nbsp-mode: space; -webkit-line-break: after-white-space; "><div>Nance (1938) gives:</div><div><b><span class="Apple-tab-span" style="white-space:pre">       </span>mar(gh)ak</b>, in MSS marrak<b>, -ek</b>, m., p<i>l. </i><b>-ghogyon, marregyon</b></div><div><b><br></b></div><div>I take this to mean that UC accepts</div><div><i><span class="Apple-tab-span" style="white-space:pre"> </span>sing. <span class="Apple-tab-span" style="white-space:pre"> </span></i><b>marghak, marak, marghek, marek</b></div><div><i><span class="Apple-tab-span" style="white-space:pre"> </span>plur.</i><b> <span class="Apple-tab-span" style="white-space:pre">      </span>marghogyon, marregyon</b></div><div><div><br></div><div>Eddie Climo</div><div><br></div><div>On 2012 Du 1, at 07:35, Craig Weatherhill wrote:</div><blockquote type="cite"><div>I was unaware that <marhegyon> was actually attested.  I've only ever seen <marhogyon>.<br></div></blockquote></div><br></body></html>