<html><head></head><body style="word-wrap: break-word; -webkit-nbsp-mode: space; -webkit-line-break: after-white-space; ">Of course marregyon is the historical form. Marhogyon is an analogical plural on the basis of marhak < marhek, after unstressed syllables were reduced to schwa an in this case the unstressed syllable was written -ak.<div><br></div><div><br><div><div>On 2 Nov 2012, at 16:43, Linus Band wrote:</div><br class="Apple-interchange-newline"><blockquote type="cite"><span class="Apple-style-span" style="border-collapse: separate; font-family: Helvetica; font-style: normal; font-variant: normal; font-weight: normal; letter-spacing: normal; line-height: normal; orphans: 2; text-align: -webkit-auto; text-indent: 0px; text-transform: none; white-space: normal; widows: 2; word-spacing: 0px; -webkit-border-horizontal-spacing: 0px; -webkit-border-vertical-spacing: 0px; -webkit-text-decorations-in-effect: none; -webkit-text-size-adjust: auto; -webkit-text-stroke-width: 0px; font-size: medium; ">My point was, anyway, that the plural in<span class="Apple-converted-space"> </span><i>marregyon/marregion</i> might contain the old //, that was retained in a stressed syllable as we would expect soundlaw-wise (c.f. /mr/ that was spelt<span class="Apple-converted-space"> </span><i>mer/muer/mur</i>).</span></blockquote></div><br></div></body></html>