<html><head></head><body style="word-wrap: break-word; -webkit-nbsp-mode: space; -webkit-line-break: after-white-space; "><div>I think there's a misunderstanding here somewhere in the threadů.</div><div><br></div><div>Both forms are historical in that they are attested and were used. It remains to decide which form is the "etymological" one, i.e. which passed through the sound changes regularly. </div><div><br></div><div>Dan</div><div><br></div><div><br></div><div><br></div><br><div><div>On Nov 3, 2012, at 1:06 PM, Hedley Climo wrote:</div><br class="Apple-interchange-newline"><blockquote type="cite"><div style="word-wrap: break-word; -webkit-nbsp-mode: space; -webkit-line-break: after-white-space; ">In UCR (NJAW 2006), we find:<div><span class="Apple-tab-span" style="white-space:pre">     </span>cavalier. <b>marhek, -hogyon</b></div><div><span class="Apple-tab-span" style="white-space:pre"> </span>chevalier. <b>marhak, -hogyon</b></div><div><b><br></b></div><div>?<b>marhegyon</b> seems not to be included at all.</div><div><br></div><div>Eddie Climo</div>
</div>_______________________________________________<br>Spellyans mailing list<br><a href="mailto:Spellyans@kernowek.net">Spellyans@kernowek.net</a><br>http://kernowek.net/mailman/listinfo/spellyans_kernowek.net<br></blockquote></div><br></body></html>