<html><head></head><body style="word-wrap: break-word; -webkit-nbsp-mode: space; -webkit-line-break: after-white-space; "><div><br></div><div>On Nov 2, 2012, at 5:43 PM, Linus Band wrote:</div><div><br></div><div><blockquote type="cite"><div class="gmail_quote"><div>I have thrown *<i>marˈxɔːk</i><i> </i>in to the soundlaw machine:</div><div>*<i>marˈxɔːk</i> (final stress!)</div><div>*<i>marˈxɔk</i></div><div><i>*marˈxœk</i> (stressed ɔ became œ in OSWBr., cf. *<i>mɔːr > meur</i>)</div><div>*<i>ˈmarxœk</i></div><div>I do not know, however, what to do in Cornish once <i>œ</i> become unstressed because of the accent shift to the penultimate syllable. Does anyone else? My point was, anyway, that the plural in <i>marregyon/marregion</i> might contain the old /œ/, that was retained in a stressed syllable as we would expect soundlaw-wise (c.f. /mœr/ that was spelt <i>mer/muer/mur</i>).</div><div><br></div><div> Linus </div></div></blockquote></div><div><br></div><div>After the accent shift /œ/ regularly unrounded and fell in with old /ɛ/ and probably developed into [ə] during the MC period. It is indeed a possibility that the reflex ‹-egyon› is the old /œ/, later unrounded even in stressed position. There is a lot of ambiguity in the texts where this is concerned. Schrijver wrote about this in SBCHP and poses the question whether PrBr /ɔː/ in pretonic position (i.e. later stressed in OC and thereafter) shortened and fell in with /o/, or whether it developed in to /œ/ linearly. The texts are not clear and there are tendencies in PA and OM, as well as partially in BM to write ‹o›, while PC often has ‹u› and RD and BM usually ‹e› and ‹v/u›; ‹u e v› are all possible spellings for /œ/ and ‹o› for /o/, so we could be dealing with a situation where the scribes of PA and OM spoke a different dialect that had /o/ from the scribes of PC, RD and BM which had /œ/. More in Schrijver SBCHP (2.2 pp. 197-209).</div><div><br></div><div>Dan</div><div><br></div><br><div><div>On Nov 2, 2012, at 5:43 PM, Linus Band wrote:</div><br class="Apple-interchange-newline"><blockquote type="cite"><br><br><div class="gmail_quote">2012/10/31 Nicholas Williams <span dir="ltr"><<a href="mailto:njawilliams@gmail.com" target="_blank">njawilliams@gmail.com</a>></span><br><blockquote class="gmail_quote" style="margin:0 0 0 .8ex;border-left:1px #ccc solid;padding-left:1ex">
<div style="word-wrap:break-word"><font face="Verdana" style="font-size:13px">In Cornish the word for 'horseman' ends either in -<i>ek</i> or -<i>ak</i>:</font><div><font face="Verdana" style="font-size:13px"><br>
</font></div><div><font face="Verdana" style="font-size:13px"><b>marrak</b> PA 246, BK 1514, 1632, 1648, <b>marrack</b> NBoson</font> </div></div></blockquote><blockquote class="gmail_quote" style="margin:0 0 0 .8ex;border-left:1px #ccc solid;padding-left:1ex">
<div style="word-wrap:break-word"><div><font face="Verdana" style="font-size:13px"><br></font></div><div><font face="Verdana" style="font-size:13px"><b>marrek</b> PA 241d, 242a, 244a, 245a, OM 2004, 2139, 2150, 2204, 2226, 2338, BM 350, 2444.</font></div>
<div><font face="Verdana" style="font-size:13px"><b>marreg</b> PA 190b, 190c, 217a, 218b.</font></div><div><font face="Verdana" style="font-size:13px"><br></font></div><div><font face="Verdana" style="font-size:13px">The voicing of the final stop in <i>marreg</i> is probably to be explained by dissimilation. The reduction of the medial -rx- to -rh- (and thus a devoiced r)</font></div>
<div><font face="Verdana" style="font-size:13px">probably led to the voicing of the final segment by dissimilation of the sequence voiceless + voiceless > voiceless + voiced.</font></div></div></blockquote><div><br></div>
<div>I haven't found any reference to a soundlaw that entails exactly this dissimilation, so I put your theory to the test by looking up 'answer'. I found:</div><div>gortheb <b>OM</b> 2229</div><div>wortheb <b>OM</b> 2235</div>
<div>worthyb <b>BK</b> 52, 192, 604, 1876, 2099, 2263, 3168</div><div>gorthyb <b>BM</b> 1442, 3457, BK 211, 1887, 2094, 2101, 2140, 2274</div><div>gorthyp <b>PC</b> 512, 1722, 1735, 1839, 2008, <b>RD</b> 494, 1228, 1834</div>
<div>gorthib <b>CW</b> 1754</div><div>gorryb <b>CW</b> 1198, 1736, 1761</div><div>(I don't have the other texts at hand, I'm afraid)</div><div><br></div><div>Perhaps an example that also has the original cluster <i>-rx-</i> would have been better, but I couldn't really think of one. Anyway, apart from PC and RD, the evidence seems to support your claim. The counterevidence still remains to be explained, however. Any ideas?</div>
<div><br></div><div><br></div><div> </div><blockquote class="gmail_quote" style="margin:0 0 0 .8ex;border-left:1px #ccc solid;padding-left:1ex"><div style="word-wrap:break-word"><div> </div></div></blockquote><blockquote class="gmail_quote" style="margin-top: 0px; margin-right: 0px; margin-bottom: 0px; margin-left: 0.8ex; border-left-width: 1px; border-left-color: rgb(204, 204, 204); border-left-style: solid; padding-left: 1ex; position: static; z-index: auto; ">
<div style="word-wrap:break-word"><div></div><div><font face="Verdana" style="font-size:13px">The original shape of the word was probably *<i>marhek</i> < *<i>marxâko</i>- cf. Welsh <i>marchog</i> < earlier <i>marchawc</i>.</font></div>
<div><font face="Verdana" style="font-size:13px"><br></font></div><div><font face="Verdana"><span style="font-size:13px">The expected plural with o (cf. <i>bohosek</i>, but <i>bohosogyon</i>) is seen in </span></font></div>
<div><font face="Verdana"><span style="font-size:13px"><br></span></font></div><div><font face="Verdana" style="font-size:13px"><b>marrogyon</b> BM 221, BK 1946, 2381, <b>marrogyan</b> BK 2252</font></div><div><font face="Verdana" style="font-size:13px"><b>marogyan</b>  OM 1876, <b>marogyen</b> BM 1742, <b>marogyon</b> BM 294, 815, 4359, BK 3286.</font></div>
<div><font face="Verdana" style="font-size:13px"><br></font></div><div><font face="Verdana" style="font-size:13px">There is, however, an analogical plural in -<i>egyon</i>:</font></div><div><font face="Verdana" style="font-size:13px"><br>
</font></div><div><font face="Verdana" style="font-size:13px"><b>marregyon</b> PC 1613, 2347,  RD 657, <b>marregion</b> RD 607.</font></div><div><font face="Verdana" style="font-size:13px"><br></font></div><div><font face="Verdana" style="font-size:13px"> I think the revived language should allow both, and spell them <b>marhogyon</b>, <b>marhegyon</b>.</font></div>
<span class="HOEnZb"><font color="#888888"><div><font face="Verdana" style="font-size:13px"><br></font></div><div><font face="Verdana" style="font-size:13px">Nicholas</font></div><div><br></div></font></span></div></blockquote>
<div><br></div><div>I have thrown *<i>marˈxɔːk</i><i> </i>in to the soundlaw machine:</div><div>*<i>marˈxɔːk</i> (final stress!)</div><div>*<i>marˈxɔk</i></div><div><i>*marˈxœk</i> (stressed ɔ became œ in OSWBr., cf. *<i>mɔːr > meur</i>)</div>
<div>*<i>ˈmarxœk</i></div><div>I do not know, however, what to do in Cornish once <i>œ</i> become unstressed because of the accent shift to the penultimate syllable. Does anyone else? My point was, anyway, that the plural in <i>marregyon/marregion</i> might contain the old /œ/, that was retained in a stressed syllable as we would expect soundlaw-wise (c.f. /mœr/ that was spelt <i>mer/muer/mur</i>).</div>
<div><br></div><div> Linus </div></div></blockquote></div></body></html>