<html><head></head><body style="word-wrap: break-word; -webkit-nbsp-mode: space; -webkit-line-break: after-white-space; ">UCR did not distinguish final f from final v: nef ~ genef.<div>UCR did not distinguish short i from long i: gwyn 'white' ~ gwyn 'wine'</div><div>UCR did not distinguish fronted u from back u: curun, cusul</div><div>UCR had no way of distinguishing the long vowel of cost 'coast' from the short vowel in 'cost'.</div><div>UCR had no way of distinguishing the voiced sound of s [z] in bras 'great' from the voiceless sound in fas 'face'.</div><div>I could go on.</div><div>KS solves all these problems without diverging too far from what is found in the texts.</div><div><br></div><div>Nicholas</div><div><br><div><div>On 14 Nov 2012, at 10:25, Michael Everson wrote:</div><br class="Apple-interchange-newline"><blockquote type="cite"><span class="Apple-style-span" style="border-collapse: separate; font-family: Helvetica; font-style: normal; font-variant: normal; font-weight: normal; letter-spacing: normal; line-height: normal; orphans: 2; text-align: -webkit-auto; text-indent: 0px; text-transform: none; white-space: normal; widows: 2; word-spacing: 0px; -webkit-border-horizontal-spacing: 0px; -webkit-border-vertical-spacing: 0px; -webkit-text-decorations-in-effect: none; -webkit-text-size-adjust: auto; -webkit-text-stroke-width: 0px; font-size: medium; ">Similarly, KS is a step forward. Unlike UC and UCR, it does try to accommodate both earlier and later pronunciation styles ("dialects", if you will). It does so accurately and regularly. That's a feature, not a fault.<span class="Apple-converted-space"> </span></span></blockquote></div><br></div></body></html>