<html><head></head><body style="word-wrap: break-word; -webkit-nbsp-mode: space; -webkit-line-break: after-white-space; ">This begs the question. What kind of Cornish and how well will the teachers know it? If they use a badly designed<div>spelling, will they pronounce the language properly?</div><div>At least we know how Irish is pronounced and there is no argument about the spelling.</div><div>The same is not true for Cornish.</div><div>Before pupils can have "fun" learning Cornish, the spelling, pronunciation, inflection and syntax</div><div>must all be certain. To teach a leaky orthography will make subsequent reform much harder.</div><div><br></div><div>Nicholas</div><div><br></div><div><br></div><div><br><div><div>On 16 Nov 2012, at 12:24, Nicky Rowe wrote:</div><br class="Apple-interchange-newline"><blockquote type="cite"><span class="Apple-style-span" style="border-collapse: separate; font-family: Helvetica; font-style: normal; font-variant: normal; font-weight: normal; letter-spacing: normal; line-height: normal; orphans: 2; text-align: -webkit-auto; text-indent: 0px; text-transform: none; white-space: normal; widows: 2; word-spacing: 0px; -webkit-border-horizontal-spacing: 0px; -webkit-border-vertical-spacing: 0px; -webkit-text-decorations-in-effect: none; -webkit-text-size-adjust: auto; -webkit-text-stroke-width: 0px; font-size: medium; ">60 minutes of fun immersion using Cornish is surely better than 60 minutes of learning about Cornish in English.</span></blockquote></div><br></div></body></html>