<html><head></head><body style="word-wrap: break-word; -webkit-nbsp-mode: space; -webkit-line-break: after-white-space; "><font class="Apple-style-span" face="Verdana" style="font-size: 13px;">I don't think Kevardhu has anything to do with ploughing.</font><div><font class="Apple-style-span" face="Verdana" style="font-size: 13px;">Du is the black month because it is the beginning of the Celtic winter. Cf. Irish dúluachair 'midwinter'.</font></div><div><font class="Apple-style-span" face="Verdana" style="font-size: 13px;">The first element in Kevardhu is probably the same element as in in the gever 'with respect to you' and cf.</font></div><div><font class="Apple-style-span" face="Verdana" style="font-size: 13px;">Welsh cyfair 'direction' and ar gyfair 'opposite'. </font></div><div><font class="Apple-style-span" face="Verdana" style="font-size: 13px;">Kevardhu I take to mean 'the month opposite i.e. following November'.</font></div><div><font class="Apple-style-span" face="Verdana" style="font-size: 13px;"><br></font></div><div><font class="Apple-style-span" face="Verdana" style="font-size: 13px;">The months of the year from January to May in Cornish all derive from Latin.</font></div><div><font class="Apple-style-span" face="Verdana" style="font-size: 13px;">Whevrel, Wherval like Welsh Chwefror has dissimilated the expected initial f to wh/chw,</font></div><div><font class="Apple-style-span" face="Verdana" style="font-size: 13px;">presumably because of the following labial continuant.</font></div><div><font class="Apple-style-span" face="Verdana" style="font-size: 13px;"><br></font></div><div><font class="Apple-style-span" face="Verdana" style="font-size: 13px;">Both Breton and Cornish have a hard g as the initial in their name for 'January'.</font></div><div><font class="Apple-style-span" face="Verdana" style="font-size: 13px;">Why Latin Ianuarius has acquired an initial [g] remains to be explained.</font></div><div><font class="Apple-style-span" face="Verdana" style="font-size: 13px;">It happened in Southern British, i.e Cornish and Breton, but not in Welsh which has Ionawr.</font></div><div><font class="Apple-style-span" face="Verdana" style="font-size: 13px;"><br></font></div><div><font class="Apple-style-span" face="Verdana" style="font-size: 13px;">One might ascribe the acquisition of the initial g to hypercorrection from an unlenited form. </font></div><div><font class="Apple-style-span" face="Verdana" style="font-size: 13px;">Cf. alyle for Galilee, which has worked in the other direction, i.e. g > 0 </font></div><div><font class="Apple-style-span" face="Verdana" style="font-size: 13px;">But the lenition of g in Breton is c'h, not zero, so that suggestion is unlikely be the whole explanation.</font></div><div><font class="Apple-style-span" face="Verdana" style="font-size: 13px;"><br></font></div><div><font class="Apple-style-span" face="Verdana" style="font-size: 13px;">Nicholas</font></div><div><br><div><div>On 24 Nov 2012, at 19:05, Hewitt, Stephen wrote:</div><br class="Apple-interchange-newline"><blockquote type="cite"><span class="Apple-style-span" style="border-collapse: separate; font-family: Helvetica; font-style: normal; font-variant: normal; font-weight: normal; letter-spacing: normal; line-height: normal; orphans: 2; text-align: -webkit-auto; text-indent: 0px; text-transform: none; white-space: normal; widows: 2; word-spacing: 0px; -webkit-border-horizontal-spacing: 0px; -webkit-border-vertical-spacing: 0px; -webkit-text-decorations-in-effect: none; -webkit-text-size-adjust: auto; -webkit-text-stroke-width: 0px; font-size: medium; "><p class="MsoNormal" style="margin-top: 0cm; margin-right: 0cm; margin-left: 5.65pt; margin-bottom: 6pt; font-size: 12pt; font-family: 'Times New Roman', serif; text-indent: -5.65pt; line-height: 10pt; "><span style="font-size: 11pt; font-family: Calibri, sans-serif; color: rgb(31, 73, 125); ">December is kerzu (kerdu in Treger, NE)<o:p></o:p></span></p></span><br class="Apple-interchange-newline"></blockquote></div><br></div></body></html>