<div class="gmail_extra"><div class="gmail_quote"><blockquote class="gmail_quote" style="margin:0 0 0 .8ex;border-left:1px #ccc solid;padding-left:1ex"><div style="word-wrap:break-word"><div>Wikipedia gives Breton <i style="font-weight:bold">Genver</i>, which I'm told is pronounced with a hard /g-/, at least in one of the dialects. By contrast, <gw-> in a word like <i style="font-weight:bold">Gwener</i>, so I'm told, is pronounced with either /gw-/ or softened to /jw-/ (a soft French-style /j-/) depending on dialect. I have no idea whether or not Breton <ge-> can soften in a similar way.<br>
</div><div><br></div></div></blockquote><div> In the Vannetais dialect of Breton we find that <i>gw-, g-, kw-, k- </i>before front vowels (<i>e, i</i>) have been changed to <i>dʒɥ-</i>, <i>dʒ-</i>, <i>tʃɥ-, tʃ-</i> ([dʒ] is the sound of <i>g-</i> in George, [tʃ] the sound of <i>ch-</i> in <i>change, </i>[ɥ] as <i>u</i> in French <i>ennuier </i>'to annoy'). But this dialect group is as far away from Cornwall as one can be in the Breton speaking world. </div>
<div><br></div><div>Linus</div></div></div>