<html><head></head><body style="word-wrap: break-word; -webkit-nbsp-mode: space; -webkit-line-break: after-white-space; "><div><div>On 2012 Du 24, at 20:50, Nicholas Williams wrote:</div><blockquote type="cite"><div style="word-wrap: break-word; -webkit-nbsp-mode: space; -webkit-line-break: after-white-space; "><font class="Apple-style-span" face="Verdana" style="font-size: 13px;">I don't think Kevardhu </font><span class="Apple-style-span" style="font-family: Verdana; font-size: 13px; ">has anything to do with ploughing.</span></div></blockquote><blockquote type="cite"><div style="word-wrap: break-word; -webkit-nbsp-mode: space; -webkit-line-break: after-white-space; "><div><font class="Apple-style-span" face="Verdana" style="font-size: 13px;">…The first element in <b>Kevardhu</b> is probably the same element as in in the gever 'with respect to you' and cf.</font><span class="Apple-style-span" style="font-family: Verdana; font-size: 13px; ">Welsh cyfair 'direction' and ar gyfair 'opposite'. </span></div><div><font class="Apple-style-span" face="Verdana" style="font-size: 13px;">Kevardhu I take to mean 'the month opposite i.e. following November'.</font></div></div></blockquote></div><br><div>The <i>Geiriadur Prifysgol Cymru</i> does, at least in part, support your assertion:</div><div><blockquote type="cite"><b>cyfair, cyfer.</b> </blockquote><blockquote type="cite">1. <i>direction, region, place, spot; opposite position.</i></blockquote><br></div><div>However, its entry for this lexeme seems to support a different possibility:</div><div><blockquote type="cite"><b>cyfair, cyfer.</b></blockquote><blockquote type="cite">…</blockquote><blockquote type="cite">2. <i>acre, a day's ploughing, cover.</i></blockquote><br></div><div>This is a close match for an entry in Mordon Nance's excellent 1952 <i>Dictionary:</i></div><div><blockquote type="cite"><b>acre.</b> <i>*kever</i></blockquote>…and in his 1938 one, we find:</div><div><blockquote type="cite"><b>kevar. </b><i>joint ploughing of land held in common </i>(W., B.)</blockquote><blockquote type="cite"><b>kever.</b><i> regard, respect, direction.</i></blockquote><br></div><div>This all suggests that 'Winter Ploughing' or 'Winter/Black Acre' is perfectly possible.</div><div><br></div><div>Eddie Climo</div></body></html>