<html><head><base href="x-msg://196/"></head><body style="word-wrap: break-word; -webkit-nbsp-mode: space; -webkit-line-break: after-white-space; "><div><div><font class="Apple-style-span" face="'Times New Roman'"><span class="Apple-style-span" style="font-size: 13px;">On 2012 Du 23, at 20:36, ewan wilson wrote:</span></font></div><blockquote type="cite"><span class="Apple-style-span" style="border-collapse: separate; font-style: normal; font-variant: normal; font-weight: normal; letter-spacing: normal; line-height: normal; orphans: 2; text-align: -webkit-auto; text-indent: 0px; text-transform: none; white-space: normal; widows: 2; word-spacing: 0px; -webkit-border-horizontal-spacing: 0px; -webkit-border-vertical-spacing: 0px; -webkit-text-decorations-in-effect: none; -webkit-text-size-adjust: auto; -webkit-text-stroke-width: 0px; font-size: 13px;"><div bgcolor="#ffffff" style="word-wrap: break-word; -webkit-nbsp-mode: space; -webkit-line-break: after-white-space; "><div><font class="Apple-style-span" face="'Times New Roman'">Fascinating thoughts on the month names. What's the Breton/Welsh equivalents for December?</font></div></div></span></blockquote></div><br><div><br></div><div>According to the <i>Geiriadur Prifysgol Cymru</i> (free, downloadable, PDF edn.), Welsh has <i style="font-weight: bold; ">Ionawr / Ionor</i>, with an initial consonantal /y-/.</div><div><br></div><div>Wikipedia gives Breton <i style="font-weight: bold; ">Genver</i>, which I'm told is pronounced with a hard /g-/, at least in one of the dialects. By contrast, <gw-> in a word like <i style="font-weight: bold; ">Gwener</i>, so I'm told, is pronounced with either /gw-/ or softened to /jw-/ (a soft French-style /j-/) depending on dialect. I have no idea whether or not Breton <ge-> can soften in a similar way.</div><div><br></div><div>As for <i style="font-weight: bold; ">Kevardhu</i>, that may come from <i style="font-weight: bold; ">kever + du</i>, meaning 'black acre'.</div><div><br></div><div>Eddie Climo</div></body></html>