<html><head></head><body style="word-wrap: break-word; -webkit-nbsp-mode: space; -webkit-line-break: after-white-space; ">This is true with most languages but is hardly relevant with Cornish. There are no native speakers, so we have to use written texts.<div><br><div><div>On 13 Jan 2013, at 18:36, Chris Parkinson wrote:</div><br class="Apple-interchange-newline"><blockquote type="cite"><span class="Apple-style-span" style="border-collapse: separate; font-family: Helvetica; font-style: normal; font-variant: normal; font-weight: normal; letter-spacing: normal; line-height: normal; orphans: 2; text-align: -webkit-auto; text-indent: 0px; text-transform: none; white-space: normal; widows: 2; word-spacing: 0px; -webkit-border-horizontal-spacing: 0px; -webkit-border-vertical-spacing: 0px; -webkit-text-decorations-in-effect: none; -webkit-text-size-adjust: auto; -webkit-text-stroke-width: 0px; font-size: medium; "><span class="Apple-style-span" style="font-family: Arial; font-size: small; "><span class="Apple-converted-space"> </span>Speech is primary in language, both historically and in L1 learning. Literary forms normally come later in an educational setting. LC users, by following Lhuyd  to a large extent, follow this order of development. So what is needed is indeed an orthography which recognises the close relation between  written and spoken Cornish</span></span></blockquote></div><br></div></body></html>