<html><head></head><body style="word-wrap: break-word; -webkit-nbsp-mode: space; -webkit-line-break: after-white-space; "><div>Mordon Nance in his excellent 1938 <i>Dictionary</i> offers us this entry:</div><div><blockquote type="cite"><b>tròvya, trouvya.</b> <i>vb.</i> to discover, find.</blockquote><blockquote type="cite"><span class="Apple-tab-span" style="white-space:pre">   </span>P(ryce. <i>Archaeologia Cornu-Britannica)</i>, Tonkin MS. (Mid.Eng. <i>trove)</i></blockquote>I wonder, though, whether this word might be an earlier loan from Norman French.<br><br></div><div>Nicholas Williams in his 2006 <i>Dictionary </i>likewise has:</div><div><blockquote type="cite"><b>trovya.</b>  <i>see under </i>discover, find, locate</blockquote><br></div><div>The absence of this lexeme in the SWF dictionary is unsurprising, as that is a less than thorough piece of lexicography. On the other hand, <i>Desky Kernowek</i> makes no claim to be a dictionary, and the sections you refer to name themselves as simply K-E/E-K Glossaries, evidently included both to act as paradigms of Kernowek Standard spelling, and to help readers with the copious instructional text that it contains.</div><div><br></div><div>Oll an gwella,</div><div><br></div><div>Eddie Climo</div><br><div><div>On 2013 Gen 19, at 22:07, Janice Lobb wrote:</div><br class="Apple-interchange-newline"><blockquote type="cite"><div dir="ltr">Dick Gendall has <b><i>trouvia</i></b> for <i>to find</i> but I cannot find a version of this in the SWF dictionary or in Desky Kernowek. Comments?<div style="">Jan</div></div></blockquote></div></body></html>