<html><head></head><body style="word-wrap: break-word; -webkit-nbsp-mode: space; -webkit-line-break: after-white-space; "><div>Jan, </div><div><br></div><div>This is a bit of a problematic word and the attestations as follows: </div><div><br></div><div>Cornish: <i>min</i> (OC), <i>myn</i> (Lh), <i>min</i> (Lh), †<i>min</i> (Pr); (<i>pl</i>.) <i>menas</i> (Gw, Pr), <i>mennyz</i> (Lh); </div><div><br></div><div>A traditional Anglo-Cornish survival is the call to sheep "<i>minny</i>-<i>minny</i>". </div><div><br></div><div>compare: </div><div>Breton: ‹<i>menn</i>›</div><div>Welsh: ‹<i>myn</i>›</div><div><br></div><div>Old/Middle Irish: ‹<i>menn</i>›</div><div>Irish: ‹<i>mion</i>›</div><div>Gaelic: ‹<i>meann</i>›</div><div>Manx: ‹<i>myn</i>›</div><div><br></div><div>These forms point to a possible Common Celtic *<i>menn-o</i>- or *<i>mend-o</i>-, though Deshayes' Breton Etymological ductionary gives *<i>min</i>-<i>o</i>-; </div><div><br></div><div>Pre-occlusion would be expected in the forms deriving from *menn-o- and *mend-o-, but not from *min-o-, though the W and B (also the Goidelic) forms point towards the former.  It is possible that:</div><div><br></div><div>a) ‹min› in its Cornish form is attested only in the Old Cornish Vocabulary and that Lhuyd and Pryce took it from there never having heard the word spoken by native speakers; </div><div><br></div><div>b) Pre-occlusion never occurred in this word, either for unknown reasons, or because Desjayes' etymology *<i>min</i>-<i>o</i>- is correct, which is doubtful because of the attestations in the other Celtic languages as well as pronunciations in the modern traditional Celtic languages. </div><div><br></div><div>c) Pryce and Lhuyd's heard speakers who didn't pre-occlude (for whatever reason, e.g. dialect); </div><div><br></div><div>The forms used in Gendall's Modern Cornish dictionaries vary between ‹<b>mynan</b>› and ‹<b>minan</b>› (based on Lhuyd's <i>mynnan</i>, <i>mynan</i>, which I suspect to be Welsh) and ‹<b>mξn</b>›, taken from the OC, but given a vowel length marker, though I see no evidence for a long vowel. Neil has ‹<b>minan</b>› and ‹<b>minnan</b>› in his dictionary. </div><div><br></div><div>I should say the SWF does as best it can by giving ‹<b>mynn</b>› only, i.e. with a short vowel and no pre-occluded SWF/L variant **<i>mydn</i>. Of course KS has the advantage of a diacritical mark to indicate shortness of the vowel by writing ‹<b>mμn</b>›.   </div><div><br></div><div>I know, not much help, but to be on the safe side, I would not recommend pre-occluding ‹nn› in this word, even if the cognates in the other Celtic languages would suggest a development of PO in Cornish likely.</div><div>Dan</div><div><br></div><br><div><div>On Apr 18, 2013, at 6:29 PM, Janice Lobb wrote:</div><br class="Apple-interchange-newline"><blockquote type="cite"><div dir="ltr">I just came across the problem of <i>goat kid(s) <b>mynnen/mynn</b> </i>in the SWF dictionary where I would want to preocclude but presume I shouldn't<div style="">Jan</div></div></blockquote></div></body></html>