<html><head></head><body style="word-wrap: break-word; -webkit-nbsp-mode: space; -webkit-line-break: after-white-space; ">If Gendall does not consider it a pattern to follow, why does he use it at all?<div><br><div><div>On 21 Apr 2013, at 15:48, Chris Parkinson wrote:</div><br class="Apple-interchange-newline"><blockquote type="cite"><span class="Apple-style-span" style="border-collapse: separate; font-family: Helvetica; font-style: normal; font-variant: normal; font-weight: normal; letter-spacing: normal; line-height: normal; orphans: 2; text-align: -webkit-auto; text-indent: 0px; text-transform: none; white-space: normal; widows: 2; word-spacing: 0px; -webkit-border-horizontal-spacing: 0px; -webkit-border-vertical-spacing: 0px; -webkit-text-decorations-in-effect: none; -webkit-text-size-adjust: auto; -webkit-text-stroke-width: 0px; font-size: medium; "><span class="Apple-style-span" style="color: rgb(31, 73, 125); font-family: Calibri, sans-serif; font-size: 15px; "><span class="Apple-converted-space"> </span>I mention that it occurs in a lesson on imperatives as opposed to a lesson on inflected prepositions, which information you did not give. Dick , as you point out, did not include it in his paradigm of  ‘in’ as he does not consider it as a pattern to follow any more than you do.</span></span></blockquote></div><br></div></body></html>