<html><head></head><body style="word-wrap: break-word; -webkit-nbsp-mode: space; -webkit-line-break: after-white-space; "><font class="Apple-style-span" face="Verdana"><span class="Apple-style-span" style="font-size: 13px;">In some forms of Cornish the word for 'pound' is *<b>peuns</b>.</span></font><div><font class="Apple-style-span" face="Verdana"><span class="Apple-style-span" style="font-size: 13px;">The late form <b>pens</b> has led people to believe that originally the word had <eu>. This I believe is a mistake.<br></span></font><div><font class="Apple-style-span" face="Verdana"><span class="Apple-style-span" style="font-size: 13px;">The Welsh form <i>punt</i> suggests that the Cornish congener was originally <b>puns</b>; this later regularly unrounded to *<b>pyns</b>.</span></font></div><div><font class="Apple-style-span" face="Verdana"><span class="Apple-style-span" style="font-size: 13px;"><b>Pyns</b> then alternated with <b>pens</b>, exactly like <b>pryns</b> ~ <b>prens</b>, <b>kyns</b> ~ <b>kens</b>, <b>myns</b> ~ <b>mens</b>, <b>dyns</b> ~ <b>dens</b>, <b>gwyns</b> ~ <b>gwens</b>; etc.</span></font></div><div><font class="Apple-style-span" face="Verdana"><span class="Apple-style-span" style="font-size: 13px;"><b>Pens</b> is thus a phonetic development of <b>puns</b> > <b>pyns</b>; *<b>peuns</b> is a ghost form. </span></font></div><div><font class="Apple-style-span" face="Verdana"><span class="Apple-style-span" style="font-size: 13px;"><br></span></font></div><div><font class="Apple-style-span" face="Verdana"><span class="Apple-style-span" style="font-size: 13px;">Nicholas</span></font></div><div><br><div><br><div><div>On 15 May 2013, at 22:24, Craig Weatherhill wrote:</div><br class="Apple-interchange-newline"><blockquote type="cite"><span class="Apple-style-span" style="border-collapse: separate; font-family: Helvetica; font-style: normal; font-variant: normal; font-weight: normal; letter-spacing: normal; line-height: normal; orphans: 2; text-align: -webkit-auto; text-indent: 0px; text-transform: none; white-space: normal; widows: 2; word-spacing: 0px; -webkit-border-horizontal-spacing: 0px; -webkit-border-vertical-spacing: 0px; -webkit-text-decorations-in-effect: none; -webkit-text-size-adjust: auto; -webkit-text-stroke-width: 0px; font-size: medium; ">I certainly do not pronounce <eus> to rhyme with (received English) "furze",as is being mooted in recent years.  I don't believe that sound ever existed in Cornish.</span></blockquote></div><br></div></div></div></body></html>