<html><head></head><body style="word-wrap: break-word; -webkit-nbsp-mode: space; -webkit-line-break: after-white-space; ">Sulis really means 'Eye' and is feminine so can be applied to a female deity. Cf. Irish súil 'eye'. The word originally meant 'sun', and is cognate with Cornish howl.<div>The basic meaning was 'sun' (cf. Gk hêlios) and was later used for 'eye' in Goidelic.</div><div>How then was the sense of 'eye, watcher' used in Scilly and Bath?</div><div><div>I don't think that the semantics of the word have really been worked out properly for Celtic. </div><div><br></div><div><div>On 15 Nov 2013, at 09:54, Craig Weatherhill wrote:</div><br class="Apple-interchange-newline"><blockquote type="cite"><span class="Apple-style-span" style="border-collapse: separate; font-family: Helvetica; font-style: normal; font-variant: normal; font-weight: normal; letter-spacing: normal; line-height: normal; orphans: 2; text-align: -webkit-auto; text-indent: 0px; text-transform: none; white-space: normal; widows: 2; word-spacing: 0px; -webkit-border-horizontal-spacing: 0px; -webkit-border-vertical-spacing: 0px; -webkit-text-decorations-in-effect: none; -webkit-text-size-adjust: auto; -webkit-text-stroke-width: 0px; font-size: medium; ">Sulis ("sillis"), also commemorated at Bath (Aquae Sulis); her name meaning something like "The Watcher".</span></blockquote></div><br></div></body></html>