<!DOCTYPE HTML PUBLIC "-//W3C//DTD HTML 4.0 Transitional//EN">
<HTML><HEAD>
<META content="text/html; charset=windows-1252" http-equiv=Content-Type>
<META name=GENERATOR content="MSHTML 8.00.6001.23536">
<STYLE></STYLE>
</HEAD>
<BODY 
style="WORD-WRAP: break-word; -webkit-nbsp-mode: space; -webkit-line-break: after-white-space" 
bgColor=#ffffff>
<DIV><FONT size=2 face=Georgia>The 'smoothing out' of the 'r' sound is something 
few Scots can understand in English dialects, especially as it then seems to 
intervene in certain other English dialects. </FONT></DIV>
<DIV><FONT size=2 face=Georgia>For instance 'Against the law' is often heard as 
'Against the LawR.' Verry peculiarr!! Is this an invasive 'Estuary English' 
feature?</FONT></DIV>
<DIV><FONT size=2 face=Georgia></FONT> </DIV>
<DIV><FONT size=2 face=Georgia>As for Scots producing a very pronounced trilled 
'r' as in Private Fraser in Dad's Army, I have to say few Scots actually realise 
the trill in quite such a strongly rolled fashion, though 'r' definitely 
makes itself felt in most  Scottish dialects.</FONT></DIV>
<DIV><FONT size=2 face=Georgia></FONT> </DIV>
<DIV><FONT size=2 face=Georgia>Ewan.</FONT></DIV>
<DIV><FONT size=2 face=Georgia></FONT> </DIV>
<BLOCKQUOTE 
style="BORDER-LEFT: #000000 2px solid; PADDING-LEFT: 5px; PADDING-RIGHT: 0px; MARGIN-LEFT: 5px; MARGIN-RIGHT: 0px">
  <DIV style="FONT: 10pt arial">----- Original Message ----- </DIV>
  <DIV 
  style="FONT: 10pt arial; BACKGROUND: #e4e4e4; font-color: black"><B>From:</B> 
  <A title=craig@agantavas.org href="mailto:craig@agantavas.org">Craig 
  Weatherhill</A> </DIV>
  <DIV style="FONT: 10pt arial"><B>To:</B> <A title=spellyans@kernowek.net 
  href="mailto:spellyans@kernowek.net">Standard Cornish discussion list</A> 
  </DIV>
  <DIV style="FONT: 10pt arial"><B>Sent:</B> Wednesday, December 11, 2013 5:57 
  PM</DIV>
  <DIV style="FONT: 10pt arial"><B>Subject:</B> Re: [Spellyans] The sound of 
  r</DIV>
  <DIV><BR></DIV>I haven't a clue when it comes to the technical terms.  I 
  simply use the same R I've spoken all my life.  Just like the older folk 
  in West Cornwall.  A R which is spoken and never left silent, e.g "baker" 
  is "BAI-ker", never "BAIK-uh".  It's simply spoken and not exaggerated in 
  any way.
  <DIV><BR></DIV>
  <DIV>Craig</DIV>
  <DIV><BR></DIV>
  <DIV><BR></DIV>
  <DIV><BR>
  <DIV>
  <DIV>On 2013 Kev 11, at 17:17, Christian Semmens wrote:</DIV><BR 
  class=Apple-interchange-newline>
  <BLOCKQUOTE type="cite">
    <DIV dir=ltr>
    <DIV>
    <DIV>Pop along to KDL and prepare for more r-r-r-r-r's than your ears can 
    stand! It is horrible.<BR><BR></DIV>That aside, Craig, do you use a 
    retroflex r or a bunched r, or both? I find it depends on the word, 
    something like "murder" seems retroflex whilst "grand" or "great" used a 
    bunched r whilst "grander" uses both.<BR><BR></DIV>
    <DIV>It can be difficult to tell without an x-ray machine or a pen to poke 
    about with to work out what the tip of your tongue is actually doing  
    :)<BR></DIV>
    <DIV><BR></DIV>
    <DIV>Is there any evidence that a pervasive trilled r was used in Cornish 
    this side of the Norman Conquest?<BR></DIV>
    <DIV><BR></DIV>Christian<BR></DIV>
    <DIV class=gmail_extra><BR><BR>
    <DIV class=gmail_quote>On 11 December 2013 16:34, Clive Baker <SPAN 
    dir=ltr><<A href="mailto:clive.baker@gmail.com" 
    target=_blank>clive.baker@gmail.com</A>></SPAN> wrote:<BR>
    <BLOCKQUOTE 
    style="BORDER-LEFT: #ccc 1px solid; MARGIN: 0px 0px 0px 0.8ex; PADDING-LEFT: 1ex" 
    class=gmail_quote>
      <P>It was used by and taught to me by Tallek and Peter Poole although only 
      as a very light trill and never with such a rrrrrr as spoken by the bard 
      you talk of Craig...his is so obviously false.....as to its validity I can 
      give no answer but believe that I have heard Nance use the same many many 
      years ago<SPAN class=HOEnZb><FONT 
color=#888888><BR>Clive</FONT></SPAN></P>
      <DIV class=HOEnZb>
      <DIV class=h5>
      <DIV class=gmail_quote>On Dec 11, 2013 4:26 PM, "Craig Weatherhill" <<A 
      href="mailto:craig@agantavas.org" 
      target=_blank>craig@agantavas.org</A>> wrote:<BR type="attribution">
      <BLOCKQUOTE 
      style="BORDER-LEFT: #ccc 1px solid; MARGIN: 0px 0px 0px 0.8ex; PADDING-LEFT: 1ex" 
      class=gmail_quote>I've heard it at a Gorsedh, from an elderly 
        (non-Cornish) bard, intoning Cornish like some Biblical prophet of doom. 
         Rak (rag) was coming out as "R-r-r-r-r-r- ak"., rather as once 
        taught in elocution lessons.  I felt so embarrassed that spectators 
        were being subjected to Cornish being spoken in such an appallingly 
        awful manner which it never had as a community language, and which was 
        far more likely to invite ridicule.  In fact, I felt 
        rather…err…"browned-off".<BR><BR>Craig<BR><BR><BR><BR>On 2013 Kev 11, at 
        15:47, Christian Semmens wrote:<BR><BR>> Whilst stumbling around the 
        internet during a quiet few minutes, I came upon someone recommending 
        the KDL free language course. I hadn't been over that fence for a while 
        so I thought I'd have a listen to the audio.<BR>><BR>> I will make 
        no further comment on it as I am no expert on ancient Cornish sounds, 
        I'll leave that for others (although I would be interested to hear if 
        anyone thinks those sounds have any merit in revived Cornish at 
        all).<BR>><BR>> That took me on to the sounds of r in British and 
        Irish dialects and, although it will be no news to others, came across 
        the "bunched r" or "molar r" and was surprised to find that I used it 
        too, particularly when in Cornwall. Although it may well be the effect 
        on my speech by having moved up-country at an early age. It appears that 
        this type of r sound is fairly common in the US and Australia. For those 
        of you who still have a full-time Cornish accent (mine is oddly 
        dependent upon which side of Gordano services I am on), do you also use 
        a bunched r sound or are your r sounds the retroflex alveolar appoximant 
        variety or a mix?<BR>><BR>> (I've never heard a Cornishman use an 
        alveolar trill, unless he was impersonating a Scotsman)<BR>><BR>> 
        Christian<BR>> 
        _______________________________________________<BR>> Spellyans 
        mailing list<BR>> <A href="mailto:Spellyans@kernowek.net" 
        target=_blank>Spellyans@kernowek.net</A><BR>> <A 
        href="http://kernowek.net/mailman/listinfo/spellyans_kernowek.net" 
        target=_blank>http://kernowek.net/mailman/listinfo/spellyans_kernowek.net</A><BR><BR><BR>_______________________________________________<BR>Spellyans 
        mailing list<BR><A href="mailto:Spellyans@kernowek.net" 
        target=_blank>Spellyans@kernowek.net</A><BR><A 
        href="http://kernowek.net/mailman/listinfo/spellyans_kernowek.net" 
        target=_blank>http://kernowek.net/mailman/listinfo/spellyans_kernowek.net</A><BR></BLOCKQUOTE></DIV></DIV></DIV><BR>_______________________________________________<BR>Spellyans 
      mailing list<BR><A 
      href="mailto:Spellyans@kernowek.net">Spellyans@kernowek.net</A><BR><A 
      href="http://kernowek.net/mailman/listinfo/spellyans_kernowek.net" 
      target=_blank>http://kernowek.net/mailman/listinfo/spellyans_kernowek.net</A><BR><BR></BLOCKQUOTE></DIV><BR></DIV>_______________________________________________<BR>Spellyans 
    mailing list<BR><A 
    href="mailto:Spellyans@kernowek.net">Spellyans@kernowek.net</A><BR>http://kernowek.net/mailman/listinfo/spellyans_kernowek.net<BR></BLOCKQUOTE></DIV><BR></DIV>
  <P>
  <HR>

  <P></P>_______________________________________________<BR>Spellyans mailing 
  list<BR>Spellyans@kernowek.net<BR>http://kernowek.net/mailman/listinfo/spellyans_kernowek.net<BR></BLOCKQUOTE></BODY></HTML>